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Maharishi Universityof Management

Course Descriptions

Undergraduate Courses:

(Click on the course title to see its description)

 

ED 110 — Learning Strategies for a Globalizing World

In this course, students practice various learning skills, breaking each one down into parts and discovering how the parts fit together and discovering how different skills connect to one another. Students from other countries discuss learning strategies they have used in their home countries and how they relate to the new strategies they have been introduced to in the U.S. American students explore college level learning strategies. Topics include: fundamentals of learning, active listening and note taking, efficient study reading, goal setting and time management, preparing for and taking exams, getting the most out of Maharishi Vedic Science points, preparing and giving group and individual presentations, internet research, and writing a research paper. (4 credits)

ED 333 — Literature for Children

Students become familiar with different genres of children’s literature, evaluate selections from those genres, use technology to respond to literature and develop their personal bibliography. (2 credits)

ED 398 — Internship in Teaching and Curriculum

This course is an elective for students who wish to have additional practical experience in elementary or secondary education. Faculty members help place students in educational institutions with responsibilities appropriate to their preparation. Students assist or co-teach in classrooms, under the supervision of University faculty. Readings, journal writing, other written exercises, and regular performance feedback help guide and inform their practical teaching experiences. (variable credits)

ED 400 — Theory and Practice of Consciousness-Based Education

Consciousness-Based℠ education is introduced in this course as the approach developed by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi to restore knowledge of the knower as the foundation and the goal of education. The course introduces the principles and practices, and a broad overview of the research on this approach to education. (2 credits)

ED 407 — Stability and Change in American Education

This course explores the historical and philosophical roots of American education as well as current school reform initiatives. Students study educational innovations with promise for improving school performance. Other topics include school law, structure of American education, major legislative initiatives, understanding educational research. (4 credits)

ED 409 — Reading and Adolescent Literature

This course addresses both the nature of the reading process and the range of literature appropriate for secondary level students (grades 7–12). Topics include a review of literacy goals for secondary education, models of reading comprehension, strategies for teaching reading skills, assessment of reading ability, types of adolescent literature, and recommended reading for different ages and interests.

ED 420 — Neurophysiology of Learning and Development

This course has two parts: the first deals with theories of human development and the second deals with theories of learning. The first part of the course looks at theories of both cognitive and affective development and deals with topics such as factors influencing development, endpoints of development, and the nature of intelligence. The second part of the course focuses both on cognitive and behavioral views of learning. Topics include classical and operant conditioning, social learning, information processing, problem solving, creativity, and constructivism. (4 credits) Prerequisite: Composition 2

ED 426 — Teaching with Learner Differences in Mind

This course investigates the various learning characteristics of students with disabilities as well as gifted students, and accommodations and modifications elementary and secondary school teachers can use to develop the full range of learning abilities. The course also considers the relationship between the individual and society, and between individual cultures in a pluralistic society. Topics include identifying the exceptional student, creating least restrictive environments, preparing the individual education plan, differentiation, identifying and preventing bias, cultural sub-groups and multi-cultural education. (4 credits)

ED 430 — Technology in the Service of Learning

This course introduces students to the range of educational technologies being used in schools today and a number of technologies that have not yet made their way into common use. Technologies studied include the interactive whiteboard, video capture of lecture or student presentation, podcasting, social media, and various Web 2.0 resources. Students add technologies to their existing repertoire and learn to evaluate the appropriateness of technologies for educational goals. (2 credits)

ED 435 — Educational Assessment and Evaluation

This course examines the theory, research, and best practice associated with classroom assessment, grading, and standardized testing in formal educational settings. Students learn the conceptual underpinnings of these areas of education and they develop within their own areas of expertise three different types of classroom assessments. Students may develop these assessments for elementary, secondary, or non-traditional teaching situations. Other topics include formative and summative assessment; reliability and validity as criteria of good assessment instruments; knowledge, reasoning, product, attitudes, and performance as four targets of assessment; selected response, essay, performance, and personal communication types of assessment; and daily, weekly, and monthly cycles of assessment. (4 credits)

ED 460 — Consciousness-Based Curriculum Design

Students learn to plan a unit of instruction using the approach of “backward design,” in the context of Consciousness-Based education. The primary tools of CBE learned are the Unified Field Chart, the main points chart, and the course overview chart. The course also introduces the fundamental principles and methods for creating classroom assessments. (4 credits)

ED 470 — Mastering Classroom Management

Students learn the basic principles of leadership and classroom management from Maharishi’s Principles of Ideal Teaching and the social science literature. They practice specific time-honored techniques and they practice developing the judgment of a leader through numerous case studies. Topics include understanding student needs, motivation, building relationships in the classroom, dealing with minor disruptions and chronic misbehavior, and problem-solving with students. (2 credits)

ED 480 — Methods of Teaching in Secondary School

This course requires that students investigate the planning, teaching, and assessment strategies that are appropriate to their intended teaching area. Students spend a good portion of their time observing and assisting in a secondary school classroom. They prepare and teach one or more lessons. Specific topics include national standards, scope and sequence in their subject, clinical interviews of students, main concepts of the discipline, and design of main points and Unified Field Charts. (4 credits)

ED 490 — Student Teaching in Secondary School >

Through daily observing, course planning, teaching, and course evaluation, students come to assume the full responsibility of the full-time teacher. Critiques by supervising and cooperating teachers and by the student teacher, weekly seminars, regular observations, and written student analyses of their teaching promote comfortable and efficient growth toward effective teaching, educational evaluation, and school leadership. (16 credits)

ED 496 — Capstone in Educational Foundations >

Students who are majoring in Educational Foundations do original research in an area of education in which they are interested. A faculty mentor guides their project, which culminates in a thesis of publishable quality and a presentation to departmental faculty and students. (8 credits)

ED 497 — The Teacher Work Sample

Students who are gaining a secondary teaching license design, teach and evaluate a unit of curriculum during student teaching. This final course is an opportunity to analyze that instructional design and reflect on future professional growth. The work sample analysis is presented to departmental faculty and students. (2 credits)

Graduate Courses

ED 505 — Learning Strategies for a Globalizing World

Harmonizing Diversity while Gaining Knowledge for Action, Achievement, and Fulfillment

In this course students explore various learning strategies and how different strategies connect to one another. Students who have come from other countries discuss leaning strategies they have used in their home countries and how they relate to the new ones they have been introduced to in the U.S. American students explore college level learning strategies. Topics include fundamentals of learning, active listening and note taking, efficient study reading, goal setting and time management, getting the most out of Maharishi Science of Consciousness elements, preparing for and taking exams, preparing presentations, internet research, and writing a research paper. The research paper is taught in different stages in order to develop critical thinking skills required for graduate level courses. (4 credits)

ED 507 — Stability and Change in American Education

Understanding the Fulfillment of the American Educational System

This course explores the history of American education, its traditions and its efforts to reform and improve. Students also learn about Consciousness-Based education as a part of this reform effort. They study research on educational innovations with promise for improving school performance. Other topics include school law, structure of American education, major legislative initiatives, understanding educational research. (4 credits)

ED 509 — Consciousness-Based Curriculum Design

Planning for Achievement and Fulfillment

Students learn to plan a unit of instruction using the approach of “backward design,” in the context of Consciousness-Based education. The primary tools of CBE learned are the Unified Field Chart, the main points chart, and the course overview chart. The course also introduces the fundamental principles and methods for creating classroom assessments. (4 credits) Prerequisite: ED 520

ED 510 — Theory and Practice of Consciousness-Based Education

This course is the foundational course for all standard and intern programs of the Education Department. It examines the fundamental goals, principles, and practices of Consciousness-Based education as developed by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. As part of this introduction, it also covers the basic principles of the Science of Creative Intelligence and Maharishi’s Principles of Ideal Teaching. (2 credits)

ED 511 — Educational Assessment and Evaluation

Charting the Growth of Self-Referral Consciousness

This course examines the theory, research, and best practice associated with classroom assessment, grading, and standardized testing in formal educational settings. Students learn the conceptual underpinnings of these areas of education and they develop within their own areas of expertise three different types of classroom assessments. Students may develop these assessments for elementary, secondary, or non-traditional teaching situations. Other topics include formative and summative assessment; reliability and validity as criteria of good assessment instruments; knowledge, reasoning, product, attitudes, and performance as four targets of assessment; selected response, essay, performance, and personal communication types of assessment; and daily, weekly, and monthly cycles of assessment. (4 credits)

ED 520 — Neurophysiology of Learning and Development in Children

How Pure Intelligence Comes to Know Itself through the Child’s Developing Nervous System

This course studies the implications of theories of human development and learning for education. The first part of the course looks at theories of both cognitive and affective development and deals with topics such as factors influencing development, endpoints of development, and the nature of intelligence. Students will study the work of Piaget, Vygotsky, Erikson, Kohlberg, Gardner, and Maharishi. The second part of the course focuses on both cognitive and behavioral views of learning. Topics include classical and operant conditioning, social learning, information processing, problem solving, creativity, and constructivism. (4 credits)

ED 526 — Teaching with Learner Differences in Mind

Honoring Diversity within the Unity of Creation

This course investigates the various learning characteristics of students with disabilities as well as gifted students, and accommodations and modifications elementary and secondary school teachers can use to develop the full range of learning abilities. The course also considers the relationship between the individual and society, and between individual cultures in a pluralistic society. Topics include identifying the exceptional student, creating least restrictive environments, preparing the individual education plan, differentiation, identifying and preventing bias, understanding cultural sub-groups and multi-cultural education.

ED 549 — Mastering Classroom Management

Gaining Leadership in the Classroom through the Authority of the Total Potential of Natural Law

Students learn the basic principles of leadership and classroom management from Maharishi’s Principles of Ideal Teaching and the social science literature. They practice specific time-honored techniques and they practice developing the judgment of a leader through numerous case studies. Topics include understanding student needs, motivation, building relationships in the classroom, dealing with minor disruptions and chronic misbehavior, and problem-solving with students (2 credits).

ED 556 — Methods of Teaching in Secondary School

Creating Courses Which Connect Every Part of Knowledge to the Whole of Knowledge and the Whole to the Self

This course builds on the general teaching methods course and requires that students investigate the theory behind teaching in their subject. They also study the planning, teaching, and assessment strategies that are appropriate to their intended teaching area. Students spend a good portion of their time observing and assisting in a secondary school classroom. They prepare and teach one or more lessons and do a mini-work sample in which they plan, teach and evaluate a lesson. Specific topics include national standards, scope and sequence in their subject, student knowledge of their subject, main concepts of the discipline, reading across the curriculum, data-based instructional decision making, and research on new trends or methods of instruction. The course is co-taught by University and school faculty (4 credits)

ED 569 — Student Teaching in Secondary School

Action and Achievement Lead to Fulfillment

Through daily observing, course planning, teaching, and course evaluation, students come to assume the full responsibility of the full-time teacher. Critiques by supervising and cooperating teachers and by the student teacher, weekly seminars, regular observations, and written student analyses of their teaching promote comfortable and efficient growth toward effective teaching, educational evaluation, and school leadership.

ED 580 — Foundations of Professional Success

Established in Being, Teach

This course is a capstone course for the Intern Teaching Program which requires teacher interns to reflect on their first year of teaching, make strategic improvements and prepare for their second year of teaching. Candidates learn the skills of website design and create two websites for courses they will be teaching in the next academic year. These websites include syllabi, classroom guidelines, evaluation plans, and resources for their planned courses. This course is offered in a distance format.

ED 585 — The Teacher Work Sample

Students who are gaining a secondary teaching license design, teach and evaluate a unit of curriculum during student teaching. This final course is an opportunity to analyze that instructional design and reflect on future professional growth. The work sample analysis is presented to departmental faculty and students. (2 credits)

ED 593 — Capstone Course for School Improvement

Students work with an advisor to plan and execute a final project, which may be focused on library research on a particular educational innovation in greater depth, or on the design of an educational program or institution applying a set of educational innovations. Each final project is presented to the community in a multi-media presentation at the end of the course. (8 credits)

ED 594 — Intern Teaching Seminar

Promoting Balance of Life in the Midst of Dynamic Activity

This course is offered concurrently with the intern’s first year of professional teaching. As candidates encounter challenges in their classrooms, they participate in regular conference phone discussions and online mentoring to address these challenges. They meet regularly with school mentors and visiting supervisors from the University, and they keep an ongoing journal which documents their discoveries and adjustments. This course is offered in a distance format. (4 credits)

ED 596 — Practicum in Teaching

This course is an application of the knowledge of teaching gained during the Master of Arts program in a full time position with a cooperating school. Students submit regular reports of their progress, as does the cooperating school. The course and the reports are oriented toward the achievement of the Iowa Professional Teaching Standards.

ED 647 — Technology in the Service of Learning

Doing Less and Accomplishing More with Technology

More and more schools are investing in technology with the hope of improving student learning. This course investigates the most promising classroom uses of technology and the strategies for applying it effectively. The course is primarily for practicing teachers and helps them better achieve their objectives with the wise use of computer-assisted instruction, Internet projects, productivity tools for teachers, and student multimedia assignments. (2-4 credits)

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