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To graduate with a BS in Maharishi AyurVeda Wellness Consultant track in Physiology and Health, students must successfully complete all requirements for the bachelor’s degree. (Please refer to “Degree Requirements” in “Academic Policies.”) As part of the requirements for the BS in Maharishi AyurVeda Wellness Consultant track in Physiology and Health, all students must complete the following required courses totaling 58 credits:

Required Courses

BIO 220 Introduction to Biology

Pure Consciousness Underlies the Structure and Behavior of All Living Beings

This introductory biology course is intended to give students a broad overview of biology and understanding of the basic biological principles with respect to humans. It is designed to acquaint students with the fundamental terms, concepts, and principles of human biology. The course includes topics about foundational concepts like: the structure of cells; transport across membranes; and structure and functions of human musculoskeletal, digestive, cardiovascular, and other organ systems. Subjects covered in this course include recent discoveries by Nobel Laureates. The understanding that cells in human physiology are a replica of natural law expressed in the ancient Veda and Vedic Literature will be explored in this course. Includes a written assignment and a public speaking exercise, in which students are required to explain the basic concepts of biology and their relation to humans. Lab sessions on the basic concepts of general biology and their application are included.

Lab fee: $25 (4 credits – cannot be taken for credit after BIO 251)

 

 

BIO 265 Human Anatomy and Physiology I

Outer Depends on Inner, the State of Inner Balance of Our Body Determines Our Health

Human Anatomy and Physiology I is the first of a two-course series exploring the terminology, structure, function, and interdependence of the human body systems, as well as relevant medical terminology. This course provides understanding of how the body’s structure and function maintains balance and homeostasis. The integrated functioning of trillions of diverse cells, each with a million chemical reactions per second, gives rise to a healthy, vital human being. Students will study tissues, organs, and organ systems and their role in maintaining health and balance. Tony Nader, MD, PhD discovered that major areas of the physiology are precisely correlated, in structure and function, to the 40 aspects of Veda and the Vedic Literature. The understanding of human physiology as a replica of natural law expressed in the ancient Vedic Literature will be explored in this two-course series. Topics include comprehensive study of the musculoskeletal system, cardiovascular, digestive, and immune systems. Subjects covered in this course include recent discoveries by Nobel Laureates.

Lab fee: $25 (4 credits)

Prerequisite: BIO 220 or BIO 251

BIO 266 Human Anatomy and Physiology II

The Dynamic Silence of the Self Is a State of Eternal Balance and Infinite Order That Is the Basis for the Orderly Growth, Coordination, and Evolution of Everything in Creation

This the second course of the two-course series of Human Anatomy and Physiology. In this course students will study the reproductive, respiratory, nervous, and endocrine organ systems. This course will present an in-depth overview of the organ systems that are major coordinators of homeostasis. Focus will be on the endocrine system and divisions of the nervous system, and how they control other organ systems of the body and maintain homeostasis. Effects of stress on human physiology, body response to stress, and the relationship between stress and lifestyle diseases will also be covered. Subjects covered in this course include recent discoveries by Nobel Laureates. Students will continue exploring how every aspect of the ancient Vedic Literature is mirrored by the human physiology. This course includes public speaking presentations based on the connection between consciousness, Veda, and human anatomy and physiology.

Lab fee: $25 (4 credits)

Prerequisite: BIO 265

FOR 479 Maharishi Vastu Architecture

Supporting an Ideal Physiology through Natural Law-Based Design and Construction

In this course students will be introduced to the range and application of Maharishi Vastu architecture.  Students will learn how the principles of Sthāpatya Veda apply with equal relevance to their own physiology, the layout of buildings and cities, the arrangement of galaxies in the universe, and the structuring dynamics of Consciousness.  Students will also become acquainted with natural and energy-efficient construction, and will understand the relationship of these contemporary interests with the timeless knowledge of Vedic architecture.This course alone does not prepare students sufficiently to start designing Vastu houses.

Materials fee: TBD (2 credits)

Prerequisite for undergraduates: FOR 103

PH 230 Maharishi AyurVeda Aromatherapy

Using Nature’s Essences for Well-Being

This course presents the history and basic principles of aromatherapy, and its application in Maharishi AyurVeda. Topics include: the chemistry and therapeutic properties of aromatic molecules; detailed descriptions of the chemical structure and properties of essential oils and hydrosols, their therapeutic effects on physiological and emotional states, and their effect on the three doshas; and indications for common ailments. In this course students will learn how to select appropriate essential oils and hydrosols for well-being in accord with the principles of Maharishi AyurVeda Aromatherapy. Includes public speaking presentations and labs.

Lab fee: $25; Materials fee: $15 (4 credits)

Prerequisite: PH 260

PH 260 Maharishi AyurVeda Course on Self-Pulse Reading for Good Health

Measuring the Impulses of the Body’s Intelligence and Restoring Balance in the Physiology through the Touch of Three Fingertips

Self-Pulse Reading is the most ancient and most natural means of determining the level of balance or imbalance in the mind and body. Taking the pulse enlivens the connection between mind and body, consciousness and matter. Furthermore, the procedure of taking the pulse produces a balancing effect on the mind and body. This course presents Maharishi’s revival of this ancient technology. In this course students will learn how to read their pulse and detect imbalances early, before they manifest as symptoms of a disease; how to determine where imbalances are; and how to restore balance. This course includes public speaking exercises.

Materials fee: $10 (4 credits)

PH 262 Maharishi AyurVeda Course on Diet, Digestion, and Nutrition

Imbibing Intelligence from Food and the Environment – Enlivening Strong Digestion and Selecting a Diet Ideally Suited to the Individual

Diet, digestion, and nutrition are fundamental to health. How we metabolize food and drink directly affects the strength, vitality, immunity, and longevity of the physiology. This course provides very practical knowledge of what to eat, when to eat, and how to eat to maintain or restore perfect balance of the three doshas – the three principal governing qualities of intelligence in the body.

Topics include: influence of consciousness on the process of digestion and nutrition, effects of different foods on physiology, categories of food according to their influence on the three doshas, and basic principles of Dravya Guna (Materia Medica) – Vedic herbology. This course includes public speaking exercises, as well as two field trips: one to local organic and natural food stores, and one to a local organic dairy production farm. Based on availability, ayurvedic cooking demonstrations are included.

Field trip fee: $20; Materials fee: $20 (4 credits)

Prerequisite: PH 260

PH 263 Maharishi Yoga Asanas

Vedic Exercise to Enliven Mind-Body Coordination to Support Pure Awareness, the State of Yoga

Yoga is one of the 40 aspects of the Veda and Vedic Literature representing unifying quality of consciousness. According to Maharishi, Yoga provides technologies to unfold the experience of the unified level of consciousness or Transcendental Consciousness.

The theoretical part of this unique course presents the knowledge of Yoga as unity and provides understanding of the specific effects of Yoga Asanas on the mind and body, physiology and consciousness. Proper practice of Yoga Asanas – another aspect of this course – provides students with the experience of deep relaxation, stress release, and expansion in the direction of unbounded pure consciousness. This course includes public speaking exercises on the effects of Yoga Asanas on specific mental and physical health conditions, and the readings of Maharishi’s commentaries to the Bhagavad-Gita as the essence of Vedic knowledge and the discipline of Yoga.

Materials fee: $10 (4 credits)

PH 320 Maharishi AyurVeda Family Health Series Course One – Healthy, Happy Mother and Baby

An Integrated Approach for Promoting Health in the Areas of Preconception, Pregnancy, Delivery, and Postnatal Care for Both Prospective Parents and the Newborn Child

The comprehensive time-tested knowledge of Maharishi AyurVeda provides the basis to give every family the best start. Topics include: preconception guidelines to maximize fertility and fetal health, month-by-month guidelines for pregnancy, strategies to facilitate labor and provide the ideal environment at delivery, and postpartum care guidelines for both parents and newborns to ensure the fullest recuperation for mothers and a healthy beginning for every family.

Materials fee: $30 (4 credits)

Prerequisites: PH 262, and either PH 263 or FOR 462; Physiology and Health majors only

PH 330 Advanced Maharishi AyurVeda Aromatherapy I

Probing Deeper into the Use of Nature’s Essences for Well-Being

This course presents advanced knowledge of aromatherapy including the approach of Maharishi AyurVeda Aromatherapy and its foundation in the Vedic science. Students will learn monographies of essential oils and hydrosols, including therapeutic formulas for specific health conditions. This course will present the effects of essential oils and hydrosols on different physiological systems in light of the discovery by Tony Nader, MD, PhD, that human physiology is the expression of Veda and the Vedic Literature. Students will deepen their understanding of how to select appropriate essential oils and hydrosols for well-being in accord with the principles of Maharishi AyurVeda Aromatherapy.

The lab component of the course will provide students hands-on experience making blends, facial and body creams, soft gels, and other preparations most suitable for their skin and body types, using essential oils and other natural organic products. This course includes public speaking presentations.

Lab fee: $50; Material fee: $15 (4 credits)

Prerequisites: PH 230, and approval of the instructor based on evaluation of portfolio of 3 case studies

PH 331 Advanced Maharishi AyurVeda Aromatherapy II

Exploring the Connections Between Nature’s Essences and Human Physiology as the Expression of Veda

This course explores the connection between Maharishi AyurVeda Aromatherapy, human physiology, and Veda and the Vedic Literature. Students will probe deeper into the relationship of specific essential oils with the different parts of the physiology in light of the discovery by Tony Nader, MD, PhD, that human physiology is the expression of Veda and the Vedic Literature. This will give students a profound, holistic understanding of Maharishi AyurVeda Aromatherapy. This course includes public speaking presentations and labs.

Lab fee: $25; Material fee: $10 (4 credits)

Prerequisites: PH 330

 

PH 380 Research Methods

This course introduces the knowledge and objective skills indispensable to scientific research. Topics include: the scientific method, logical and practical considerations in experimental design and data acquisition, procedures for conducting literature reviews, selection of research topics, research ethics, and practical research aids such as computer-assisted data analysis. Particular emphasis is placed on clinical research design, including proper choice of control subjects and the prevention of bias in subject selection. This course includes two public speaking presentations: one on an original research study to evaluate the research design for its strengths and weaknesses, and another on the student’s own research proposal, including the critique of the design of the proposed study in terms of threats to validity.

(4 credits)

PH 430 Maharishi AyurVeda Wellness Consultant Training

Learning How to Guide Clients to Wellness and Health

This course prepares students to consult with clients, family, and friends, helping them achieve higher levels of health and wellness through Maharishi AyurVeda. Students will understand and apply the knowledge of mind-body types, and the dietary and lifestyle origins of imbalance. Topics include: ayurvedic anatomy and physiology; the role of consciousness at the basis of physiology; the use of ayurvedic pulse reading to detect the level and the root cause of imbalance; the means to restore balance with the use of herbs, diet, aromatherapy, Maharishi Yoga Asanas, and other modalities of Maharishi AyurVeda; protocols for common imbalances; and how to obtain and retain clients in the wellness consultant practice. Includes case workshops and public speaking presentations.

Materials fee: $65 (4 credits)

Prerequisites: PH 262 and BIO 266

 

PH 431 Maharishi AyurVeda Wellness Consultant Practicum

During this course students get practical experience of the knowledge gained in all the previous courses in Maharishi AyurVeda, and build confidence in consulting with clients, family, and friends to guide them to higher levels of health and wellness. In the clinical setting, students take turns leading consultations, and participate in discussions of case studies under the supervision of experts in Maharishi AyurVeda and modern medicine. By the end of the course students are required to complete their major capstone project, consisting of a reflection paper and a portfolio of case studies based on at least 50 clinical encounters (including observation, student/client encounter with direct supervision and one-on-one cases). (4 credits – may be repeated for credit up to four times with the permission of the department Academic Advisor. This course is limited in size, with preference given to seniors and students who require this course to meet their graduation requirements)

Prerequisites: PH 430, and either PH 263 or FOR462

Note: The course is designed to provide practice of how to advise others in developing a personalized approach to health and wellness based on the principles of Maharishi AyurVeda. Regulations regarding health care practice and professional licensure standards vary by state and country. Course participants should be familiar with the laws of the jurisdiction in which they intend to be active to ensure that the scope of their activities does not violate regulations regarding health care practice. Becoming a Maharishi AyurVeda Wellness Consultant does not confer professional licensing status and Maharishi University of Management makes no representations regarding its economic or other value.

Course offerings may vary each year. With the exception of PH 431, which can be repeated for credit up to four times, courses generally cannot be repeated for credit, only for knowledge.

Note: Students may fulfill all or some of their requirements for biology by having completed equivalent undergraduate coursework at an accredited university and earned a grade of “B-” or higher. Undergraduate degree students can apply transfer credits to cover the general education requirements, electives, and up to half the coursework in the major (20 credits) for a maximum of 70 total credits.

 

Additional Requirement: Completion of Major Senior Project

The senior project for the bachelor’s in Physiology and Health consists of a reflection paper and a portfolio of case studies. This reflection paper (1000-1200 words) is integral to the case studies. Students reflect on what they have learned from their case studies and demonstrate their understanding of the core principles of Maharishi AyurVeda and how these principles relate to human physiology and optimal state of health.

 The portfolio of case studies (based on at least 50 clinical encounters including observation, student/client encounter with direct supervision, and one-on-one cases) is the means to demonstrate competence in evaluating the level of balance, causative factors, and ayurvedic pathology. Appropriate measures are recommended to restore balance through stress reduction, lifestyle, diet, spices, herbal supplements, meditation, yoga, and other modalities of Maharishi AyurVeda.

Maharishi AyurVeda Wellness Consultant track students are required to complete the major senior project during two courses of PH 431 Maharishi AyurVeda Wellness Consultant Practicum.

* Graduation requirements vary from year to year. The requirements on this page are current for the 2015-2016 academic year. Please refer to the official MUM catalog for requirements for other academic years.

Recommended courses

BIO 251 Principles of Biology

This course shows how the dynamic intelligence at the basis of life unfolds in terms of the principles discovered in biochemistry, cell biology, and genetics. These principles are seen to uphold the self-organization, maintenance, and evolution of life on earth. Emphasis is placed on the expressions of intelligence, order, and integration found at different levels of biological organization. Main topics are Cells and How They Transform Energy, Classical Genetics, Principles of Evolution, and Biological Diversity and Its Evolution. Oral presentations by students on topics of greatest interest to them are a part of the course. Includes laboratory.

(Lab fee $25)

(4 credits)

Prerequisite: CHEM 111 or placement into CHEM 201 or approval of the instructor.

BIO 252 Cell and Molecular Biology I

This course presents the foundations of (mainly human) biology at the cellular and molecular levels, emphasizing the fundamental themes of natural law in the ordered structures and functions of the cell. Topics include: Review of the Chemical Constituents of Life; Bioenergetics, Enzymes and Metabolism; Structure and Functions of the Plasma Membrane; Aerobic Respiration and the Mitochondrion; Photosynthesis and the Chloroplast; Interaction of Cells with their Environment; The Cytoplasmic Membrane System; Cytoskeleton and Cell Motility; and Techniques in Cell and Molecular Biology. Oral presentations by students on topics of greatest interest to them are a part of the course. Includes laboratory.

(Lab fee $25)

(4 credits)

Prerequisite: BIO 251

BIO 253 Cell and Molecular Biology II

This course presents the foundations of (mainly human) biology at the cellular and molecular levels, emphasizing the fundamental themes of natural law in the genetic material and interactions with the environment. Topics include: The Nature of the Gene and the Genome; Gene Expression: From Transcription to Translation; The Cell Nucleus and Control of Gene Expression; DNA Replication and Repair; Cellular Reproduction; Cell Signaling and Signal Transduction; Cancer; The Immune Response; and Techniques in Cell and Molecular Biology. Oral presentations by students on topics of greatest interest to them are a part of the course. Includes laboratory.

(Lab fee $25)

(4 credits)

Prerequisite: BIO 252

BIO 273 Advanced Topics in Molecular and Cell Biology

This course presents advanced topics in cellular and molecular biology. The course will include a more detailed examination of human DNA and gene expression, enzymes and metabolism, cell components, cell division, and specialized cells and tissues of the body. Includes public speaking presentations explaining basic concepts of molecular biology to quantum biology and their connection to AyurVeda.

(Lab fee $25)

(4 credits)

Prerequisite: BIO 253

CHEM 111 Fundamentals of Chemistry

This course is designed to impart the fundamental concepts and principles of chemistry, such as atomic structure, nomenclature, stoichiometry, and chemical bonds. For students interested in an introduction to chemistry, and those intending to enroll in the Pre- Integrative Medicine chemistry series – CHEM 201 et seq. – that need initial exposure to, or a review of, the basics of chemical problem solving and concepts. Includes experiment demonstrations as well as public speaking presentation on explaining fundamental concepts of chemistry.

(4 credits)

Prerequisite: MATH 153

CHEM 201 General Chemistry I

Topics include measurement and dimensional analysis; atoms, molecules, and ions; stoichiometry, mass relationships in chemical reactions; reactions in aqueous solutions; electronic structure of atoms and periodicity; ionic bonds and some main-group chemistry; covalent bonds and molecular structure. Includes public speaking presentation explaining basic concepts of general chemistry. Weekly laboratory sessions are included.

Lab fee: $25

(4 credits)

Prerequisites: MATH 162 and one of the following: CHEM111, or placement through the chemistry assessment process, or approval of the instructor.

CHEM 202 General Chemistry II

Topics include thermochemistry; gases; liquids, solids, and phase changes; solutions and their properties; chemical kinetics; chemical equilibrium; aqueous equilibria: acids and bases. Includes public speaking presentation explaining basic concepts of general chemistry. Weekly laboratory sessions are included.

Lab fee: $25

(4 credits)

Prerequisite: CHEM 201

CHEM 203 General Chemistry III

Topics include applications of aqueous equilibria, e.g., buffered solutions, titrations and pH curves, solubility products; thermodynamics: spontaneity, entropy, free energy; electrochemistry; main-group elements; transition metals, complex ions and crystal field theory; metals; nuclear chemistry; and an overview of organic and biological molecules. Includes public speaking presentation explaining basic concepts of general chemistry. Weekly laboratory sessions are included.

Lab fee: $25

(4 credits)

Prerequisite: CHEM 202

CHEM 311 Organic Chemistry I

Topics include structure and bonding, polar covalent bonds, acids and bases, formal charge, resonance, nomenclature and stereochemistry of alkanes and cycloalkanes, stereochemistry at tetrahedral centers, overview of organic reactions, nomenclature, synthesis and reactions of alkenes and alkynes. Includes public speaking presentation explaining basic concepts of organic chemistry. Weekly laboratory sessions are included.

Lab fee: $25

(4 credits)

Prerequisite: CHEM 203

CHEM 312 Organic Chemistry II

Topics include nomenclature and chemistry of aromatic compounds, structure determination using infrared, ultraviolet, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry, nucleophilic substitutions and eliminations of organohalides, nomenclature, properties, synthesis and reactions of alcohols, phenols, thiols, ethers, and sulfides, nomenclature, preparation, and nucleophilic addition reactions of aldehydes and ketones. Includes public speaking presentation explaining basic concepts of organic chemistry. Weekly laboratory sessions are included.

Lab fee: $25

(4 credits)

Prerequisite: CHEM 311

CHEM 313 Organic Chemistry III

Topics include carboxylic acids, their derivatives and nucleophilic acyl substitution reactions, carbonyl alpha-substitution and condensation reactions, amines and heterocycles, and biomolecules and their metabolism: amino acids, peptides, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Includes public speaking presentation explaining basic concepts of organic chemistry. Weekly laboratory sessions are included.

Lab fee: $25

(4 credits)

Prerequisite: CHEM 312

CHEM 350 General Biochemistry

This course focuses on the basic chemical structures and chemical transformations that take place in living systems. Topics include the structure, kinetics, and regulation of enzymes; bioenergetics; and intermediary metabolism. Includes public speaking presentation explaining basic concepts of general biochemistry. Weekly laboratory sessions are included.

Lab fee: $25

(4 credits)

Prerequisite: CHEM 313

ED 321 Neurophysiology of Learning and Development in Children

How Pure Intelligence Comes to Know Itself through the Child’s Developing Nervous System

Brain structure and functioning constrain what and how a child can learn. This course explores the relation of brain development, cognitive development and learning across the lifespan. As part of the course students observe lower, middle, and upper school classes, and write a paper that ties together their observations of student learning with the details of brain development. Topics include classical and operant conditioning, social learning, information processing, problem solving, creativity, and constructivism.

(4 credits)

Prerequisite: WTG 192

FOR 422 Human Relations in a Diverse Society

This course develops an awareness of and appreciation for the values, life styles, history and contributions of various identifiable subgroups in our society. Activities and discussions will help students recognize and deal with dehumanizing biases such as sexism, racism, prejudice, and discrimination and become aware of the impact that such biases have on interpersonal relations.

(2 credits)

Prerequisites: FOR103

FOR 438 Ideal Relationships

Improving Your Relationships by Exploring the Principles of Natural Law That Operate in All Relationships

We live our lives in relationships, beginning with our mother, father, and family, expanding to our friends, spouse, and children, our business associates, our fellow citizens, and on to all the people of the world. Handling these relationships with wisdom, appropriateness, and love is central to our good fortune. The Science of Creative Intelligence and Maharishi Vedic Science provide insights into how all relationships have their source in the self-referral dynamics of consciousness, our own Self — and guidelines for ensuring that our relationships are in accord with the natural evolution of life in accord with natural law. The course features tapes of Maharishi, guest presentations, group projects, and practical knowledge of etiquette. (2 credits) Prerequisite for undergraduates: FOR 103

FOR 451 Building a Sthapatya Veda Home

This course will outline basic principles of Maharishi Sthapatya Veda (MVS) design, show how these principles can guide the design of a new home and how that design can be authentically expressed as a finished structure through care and precision during the construction process. The course will feature presentations by experts in this field, a tour of MSV homes, and a step-by-step review of a special country cabin project.

(2 credits)

Prerequisite for undergraduates: FOR 103

FOR 454 Yoga Sūtra

Textbook for the Science and Technologies of Consciousness

In this Forest Academy, students read the Yoga Sūtra in Sanskrit and in English, and learn Vedic Expressions from the Yoga Sūtra emphasized by Maharishi. Students view tapes by Maharishi on Yoga and the Yoga Sūtra. Students have the opportunity to round for the entire two weeks.

(2 credits — may be repeated for credit)

Prerequisite: MVS 102, Prerequisite for undergraduates: FOR 103

FOR 458 AyurVedic Cooking

This course provides principles and practical knowledge of how to promote good health through proper nutritious diet. Participants learn to select their own specific diet based on their body type and according to time of day and season, to achieve balanced digestion in order to promote optimal nourishment and health. Topics include: cooking method and its effect on quality, the right time to cook and eat, the cycle of seasons as well as life’s seasons, the effects of food on the development of higher stages of consciousness.

(2 credits)

Prerequisite for undergraduates: FOR 103

MC-D 365 Next Generation Web Design

Integrating Graphics, Animation, Video, and Audio to Create Illuminating User Experiences

Students learn to use powerful tools for Web design, Web animation and video to build richly interactive Web sites that inspire the viewer. Topics include: conceptualizing new user experiences; creating innovative Web sites in HTML 5 with Web site builders; creative user interface construction with Adobe Muse; choosing, building and using WordPress templates.

(Lab fee $40)

(4 credits)

Prerequisite: basic computer skills

MC-D 366 Graphic Design for Media and Communications I

Integrating Medium and Message

This course provides students with the basic practical knowledge and skills needed to create effective visual design using current and critical tools and techniques. Students focus on developing their graphic design skills for personal and professional usage using Photoshop and InDesign. Topics include: digital imaging and page layout tools; principles and elements of visual design; color theory, layout design; basic principles and history of typography; brand design; use of digital photography; and copyright law.

(Lab fee $40)

(4 credits)

Prerequisite: basic computer skills

MC-D 368 Graphic Design for the Web

Fast Path to Instantaneous Global Communication

Students learn a process that allows graphic designers to create Web sites without writing HTML code. This course focuses on understanding the graphic design process of converting Photoshop files into working Web pages. Students learn how to create graphic design web templates and easily turn them into highly functional Web pages using Adobe Muse software. Topics include: layering imagery; the ingredients of interaction; creating elegant, highly interactive Web site content without writing code; video and audio for the Web; defining features; budgets, pricing and the Web design marketplace; how to hire a programmer to add additional features to your Web site; communicating with clients and programmers; competitions, awards, promotion, and findability.

(Lab fee $40)

(4 credits)

Prerequisite: basic computer skills

MGT 200 Principles of Business Success

Principles of Marketing, Finance, Operations, Accounting, and Human Resource Management as the Keys to Creating Happiness, Health, and Good Fortune in Business Enterprises

This course provides a holistic overview of business for new management majors or students from other majors. Principles of marketing, finance, operations, accounting, and human resources are taught in the perspective of an integrated business strategy and are illustrated by lively examples from videos, case studies, guest speakers, and field trips.

(4 credits)

MGT 201 Business Communication Skills

Creating a Frictionless Flow of Communication between Sender and Receiver through Effective Presentations and Writing

Effective communicators are skilled at both informing and inspiring other people. This course provides instruction and practice in making oral and written presentations based on the principle that ideal communication is a frictionless flow that nourishes both sender and receiver. Topics include: word processing and presentation software; library and Internet research skills; oral presentations; writing letters, reports, proposals, and manuals; and the principles of ideal communication.

(4 credits)

Prerequisite: WTG 192

MGT 230 The Successful Entrepreneur

This course is an introduction to the life of the entrepreneur as told through case studies and personal histories. Topics include the mindset required of an entrepreneur, how to recognize a good idea for a business, issues in managing people and getting funding, balancing work and family life, entrepreneurship in international business and in the non-profit sector.

(4 credits)

MGT 346 Career Strategies

Choosing a Career to Maximize Inner and Outer Fulfillment

The course has a practical focus on career discovery and implementation. In the framework of Consciousness-Based principles for success, students consider their own skills, abilities, and objectives, and learn to design a career that utilizes their talents and creativity for maximum effectiveness, achievement, and evolution. They design an action plan to implement their career goals, and then work with the best Internet resources to research occupational interests, business and service organization profiles, and industry trends. Students learn networking strategies, including interviews, and using the telephone and Internet for extending their professional networks. They also develop scripts for introducing themselves and describing their achievements and capabilities with confidence in various formats, writing about themselves in the cover letter, resume, and portfolio, and speaking about themselves and what they can offer to potential colleagues, funding agencies and employers.

(2 credits)

Prerequisite: third year of undergraduate study

MUS 216 Sacred Music, Chants, and Recitations

Diving Deeply into the Power of Sound

This course investigates sacred music from a rich diversity of ancient traditions, including Native American, African, Hebrew chant, Gregorian chant, Gandharva Veda ragas, Vedic recitation, and others. Students explore new ways of musical self-expression through listening, chanting, creating, performing. There will also be readings and discussions on music as a vehicle for communication, health, community, and spirituality. We locate these universal themes within ourselves through self-knowledge — the experience of our own innermost field of consciousness, accessed directly in our daily Transcendental Meditation program practice. Prior training in music or Sanskrit is welcome but not necessary.

(4 credits)

MVS 102 Sanskrit

Learning the Sounds of Nature

“Consciousness is the most basic element in creation; therefore the study of consciousness and research in consciousness, which is offered by the traditional Vedic Literature, gives the student the ability to do anything and achieve anything with the support of the evolutionary power of natural law.” — Maharishi

Reading the Vedic Literature in Sanskrit is a new technology of Maharishi Vedic Science to speed the development of higher states of consciousness. In this course, students learn to read the Vedic Literature in Sanskrit and discover how this practice actually strengthens brain functioning. Students also learn the basic principles of Maharishi Vedic Science, including the recent discovery of how human physiology forms a perfect replica of natural law, as embodied in the 40 aspects of the Veda and Vedic Literature. This historic discovery reveals that the natural laws governing the universe are the same laws governing our physiology — meaning that each of us has access, within our own physiology, to the total potential of natural law. This in turn gives us the potential to know anything, do anything, and accomplish anything.

(4 credits)

MVS 208 Fundamentals of Maharishi Vedic Science

Atma and Veda – the Self-Referral Dynamics of Consciousness Underlying the Individual and the Universe

This course systematically investigates Maharishi’s explanation of the self-referral dynamics and structure of pure consciousness, as being the ultimate source and content of all the Laws of Nature that are responsible for the creation and orderly functioning of both individual and universal life. Topics include the analysis and synthesis of the Nature and range of Atma, the universal Self of every individual; how the fluctuations of Atma appear as the structure and qualities of the four Vedas in terms of their qualities and sequential unfolding; how the structures and functions of the Vedas correspond to the human physiology and the cosmic physiology of the cosmos; the reading of the Vedic Literature in Sanskrit; and exploring the correlation between the cosmic creative process as expressed in the Vedas with theories of the structure and functioning of the unified field Superstring theory of modern quantum physics.

(4 credits)

MVS 240 EEG, Brain, and Enlightenment

EEG, Brain, and Enlightenment: Brain Functioning Underlies Conscious Processing, States of Consciousness, and Enlightenment

Brain functioning underlies conscious processing, states of consciousness, and enlightenment. Students will learn how to record EEG (brain waves) and other physiological measures (breath rate, heart rate, and skin conductance), will learn the brain signatures of the practice of the Transcendental Meditation technique and of higher states of consciousness, and will conduct original research testing a research question that they generate during the course.

(4 credits)

MVS 300 Science of Being and Art of Living

Maharishi’s Guide to Life in Enlightenment

Science of Being and Art of Living was Maharishi’s first book, published in 1963. In this course, both through reading and through studying Maharishi’s video tapes, students investigate the main themes of the book — Being, the essential constituent of creation; how to contact and how to live Being; how to live one’s full potential, in thought, speech, action, and relationships; and God realization.

(4 credits)

MVS 302 Bhagavad-Gita — Chapters 1-3

The Principles of Dharma, the Eternal Nature of Life, and Effortlessness of Transcending as the Basis of Right Action

This course studies Maharishi’s translation and commentary on the Bhagavad-Gita, a work that sequentially unfolds profound principles of human behavior. The Bhagavad-Gita, as a textbook for Maharishi Vedic Science, contains the essence of the detailed knowledge of consciousness contained in the Vedic Literature. Topics include the scope, structure, and dynamics of human behavior; the seven states of consciousness; collective consciousness; and the solution to the fundamental dilemma at the basis of human suffering.

(variable credits)

MVS 321 Reading the Vedic Literature I

Cultivating Total Brain Functioning for Higher States of Consciousness

During this course students will read the classical texts of Vedic Literature in the Devanagari script. The texts are read for the sound value, enjoying benefits in consciousness and in physiology. Students will begin this course with a major division of the Vedic Literature.

(4 credits)

Prerequisites: MVS 102 and permission of the instructor

PH 120 Introduction to Modern Psychology

Human Motivation and Development

This course is designed to give the student a basic understanding of the psychology of human behavior. The student will be exposed to terminology, principles, and theories of modern psychology. Includes public speaking presentations on course topics.

(4 credits)

Prerequisite: open to Physiology and Health majors only

PH 225 CCTS: Examining Health Care Systems in the Light of Cultural Bias

Alternative Solutions to Good Health

Students explore underlying assumptions that make up their worldview. Important health- related issues including stress, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and others, are examined in light of current approaches to health, including modern medicine and Maharishi AyurVeda. This class includes creative problem solving, analysis of current issues through writing, and group discussions. Includes public speaking presentations on course topics.

(4 credits)

Prerequisites: none.

PH 398 Internship

Expanding the Knowledge of Physiology and Health in the Field

Students observe and work in Maharishi Medical Centers or medical laboratories, schools or health care facilities in various aspects of health care, research, clinical operations patient care, health education, etc.

(4 credits — may be repeated for credit)

Prerequisites: Consent of the department faculty and the Academic Standards Committee

PH 431 Maharishi AyurVeda Wellness Consultant Practicum

This course is required for the major, but may be repeated for credit up to four times with permission of the Academic Advisor. See course description above.

PHYS 207 Classical Mechanics, Thermodynamics, and Solids

Analysis and Synthesis

This course presents classical mechanics topics including kinematics, Newton’s Laws, momentum, collisions, work and energy. The course also runs through thermodynamics and the characteristics of solids. The course is an algebra-based, non-calculus physics class appropriate for students in the pre-integrative medicine track. The structure includes lectures that cover the topics conceptually and mathematically in addition to practical application-based lab sessions. A very hands-on course that incorporates Workshop Physics, an innovative active-learning-based approach to teaching classical physics

(Lab fee $25) (4 credits)

Prerequisite: MATH 162

PHYS 208 Rotational Motion, Fluid Dynamics, and Optics

Unity at the Basis of Diversity

This course presents classical physics topics including rotational motion, fluid dynamics, vibration and waves, and light. The course is an algebra-based, non-calculus physics class appropriate for students in the pre-integrative medicine track. Emphasis is on understanding concepts and application as opposed to mathematical derivation. The structure includes lectures that cover the topics conceptually and mathematically, along with practical application-based lab sessions. The course incorporates RealTime Physics and Interactive Lecture Demonstrations; both active-learning-based approaches to classical physics.

(Lab fee $25) (4 credits)

Prerequisite: PHYS 207

PHYS 209 Acoustics, Electricity, Magnetism, and Nuclear Physics

The Universality of Natural Law

This course presents classical physics topics including acoustics, electrostatics, magnetism, electronic circuit elements, atomic structure, radioactivity, and nuclear fission and fusion. The course is an algebra-based, non-calculus physics class appropriate for students in the pre-integrative medicine track. Emphasis is on understanding concepts and application as opposed to mathematical derivation. The structure includes lectures that cover the topics conceptually and mathematically along with practical application-based lab sessions. The course incorporates RealTime Physics and Interactive Lecture Demonstrations; both active-learning-based approaches to classical physics.

(Lab fee $25) (4 credits)

Prerequisite: PHYS 208

SL—A101 Organic Agriculture

Nourishing Civilization through Safe Food Production

This course will explore how aligning agriculture with Natural Law can be accomplished using the basic principles of ecological agriculture at all stages of food production, processing, and marketing. Students will examine the influence of conventional agricultural practices on ecosystems, environmental quality, and human health, as well as its impact on socio-cultural and economic aspects. The course also includes hands-on organic agriculture production practices such as soil management, composting, pest management, harvesting, storage, s and marketing. Specific management requirements for important vegetable and field crops will also be discussed. The course also explores understanding of USDA organic standards and certification system. A case study on Bhutan as the first country going 100% organic by 2020 will be discussed in detail. Students spend approximately half of their time in class learning principles of crop production and half of the time applying their knowledge and gaining practical experience at the University’s organic farm and greenhouses or other organic farms. Course fee: $65.

(4 credits)

SL-A 202 Biodynamic Agriculture

Biodynamic Agriculture is an advanced state of organic farming which laid the foundation for a new way of thinking about our relationship to earth and the environment. It was the first ecological farming system to raise voice against the commercial fertilizers and pesticides during the early years of industrial agriculture. In Biodynamic agriculture a farm is considered as a self-sufficient organism with interactions with biotic and abiotic factors. This course will introduce students to biodynamic agriculture, concepts, principles and practices. Students will understand soil as a living entity, soil formation, classification, agronomic aspects comprising soil fertility, nutrient cycling, and the importance of soil organic matter. This course will also cover biodynamic preparations, which are vital in this system of farming. In addition, the use of cow horn manure and silica crystals in farming will be dealt in detail. The role of planets and constellations on plants and farming to attune the crops to the biorhythms of nature will be discussed. The Demeter Biodynamic and Processing Standards for certification and marketing of certified products will also be covered.

(Course fee $65)

(4 credits)

SL–B101 Sustainability, Buildings, and the Built Environment

The built environment consists of all the things that humans build: buildings and the rural, suburban, and urban context in which they are placed. Buildings, the cities they are placed in, and the transportation systems that connect them are the biggest things that humans build. Designing and building them sustainably is one of the greatest challenges facing humanity. This course gives an overview of issues of sustainability in the built environment and the developing solutions –high performance solar powered buildings, natural building, the ecocity movement, reuse of existing structures, urban agriculture, managing water in the urban landscape, turning wastes into resources. We’ll also explore how we can use the ancient ideas about orientation and placement of buildings and the design of cities from Maharishi Sthapatya Ved in the design of the contemporary sustainable built environment. The goal is to create a built environment that, like the natural environment, is regenerative, giving back more than it takes. This course is one of six required core courses in the Sustainable Living program and is a prerequisite to other courses in the Built Environment track.

Course fee: $65. (4 credits)

SL-G 101 Permaculture Design

Permaculture Design is a system for rethinking and redesigning of every aspect of human endeavor in terms of sustainability. As such, it is a cross-disciplinary design system that involves architecture and building, agriculture, energy, urban and city design, economics and livelihoods, water, and the aesthetic integration of all of these in human settlements. On successful completion of the course, students will receive an internationally recognized certificate. The basic principles of permaculture design were developed by integrating the observation of natural systems, traditional indigenous wisdom, and modern scientific and technological knowledge by David Holmgren and Bill Mollison. Through lecture, discussion, observation, field trips, hands-on learning, videos, slide shows, and handouts, students gain the practical skills and theoretical knowledge to design and implement sustainable systems in harmony with the natural world so participants can understand and apply these methods and skills to their home property and local community. Participants will learn principles and methodologies of sustainable design, how to read the landscape’s strategies and tools for urban and rural homesteads, food forests and orchards, greenhouse operation, natural building and alternative energy techniques. This is a foundation course for the entire Sustainable Living program.

Lab fee: $65 (4 credits)

SL-G 107 Ecology

Ecology is often defined as the study of relationships between organisms and their living and non-living environment. The term has become more generalized in recent years to refer to a set of interacting entities in an environment. These entities could be thoughts, technologies, beliefs, organisms, pollutants, or mountains and the environment could be an individual mind, community, society, organism, planet, culture, or meadow. This more generalized notion of ecology opens us up to understand ecology as something that exists in the universe rather than just a lens or set of questions through which we gain knowledge of the world. In this course students will learn about: fundamental ecological concepts including niche, habitat, community, ecosystem, biomes, biosphere, population ecology, species interactions, energy flows, nutrient cycling, succession.

(Course fee $65) (4 credits)

SL-G 195 Living Systems

How Life’s Dynamic Intelligence Applies the Principles of Biochemistry, Cell Biology, and Genetics to Uphold Self-Organization, Maintenance, and Evolution of Life

Fundamental to all life are basic functions that uphold self-organization, maintenance, and evolution. This course covers aspects of biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, and evolution, with emphasis on the expressions of intelligence, order, and integration found at different levels of biological organization.

(Course fee $65) (4 credits)

SL–G200 Building Biology

This course examines the link between building practices and occupants’ health and wellbeing. Founded in Germany over 30 years ago, Building Biology not only encompasses sustainable and green practices, but also goes beyond them. It focuses on “building for life,” or how to optimize living conditions by applying healthy building and remodeling principles to living spaces. Students will find out how current construction practices impact the health of occupants and will gain skills to identify, analyze, and solve problems dealing with electromagnetic radiation, high- frequency radiation, indoor air quality, and water quality. They will also learn about natural building and remodeling practices through home inspections, case study reviews, and teleconferences with Building Biologists from around the country. The course looks at healthy buildings from different perspectives: a) elements — how air, water, matter, and energy impact the indoor environment, including health risks and remedies, b) design — what design features promote a healthy building, and c) standards — applying Building Biology Healthy Home Standards.

(4 credits)

SL-G 201 Ecology

Observe How Living Organisms Maintain Perfect Orderliness in Their Physical Environment by Efficient

Ecology is often defined as the study of relationships between organisms and their living and non-living environment. The term has become more generalized in recent years to refer to a set of interacting entities in an environment. These entities could be thoughts, technologies, beliefs, organisms, pollutants, or mountains and the environment could be an individual mind, community, society, organism, planet, culture, or meadow. This more generalized notion of ecology opens us up to understand ecology as something that exists in the universe rather than just a lens or set of questions through which we gain knowledge of the world. In this course students will learn about fundamental ecological concepts, including niche, habitat, community, ecosystem, biomes, biosphere; population ecology; species interactions; energy flows; nutrient cycling; and succession.

Lab fee: $65.

(4 credits)

Prerequisites: SL-G100 (CCTS) or consent of the instructor

SL-G 280 Ethnobotany

How Indigenous Peoples Use Plants for Culinary, Spiritual, Medicinal, and Other Purposes to Maintain Traditional Connections with Natural Law

Plants have met a large proportion of man’s physical, emotional, and spiritual needs for ages and continue to do so today, though often in new and less obvious ways. The broad scope of such use is the subject of this course, covering not only food and shelter but also clothing, herbs and spices, ornamentation, medicine, soaps, cosmetics, rope, and rubber, as well as artistic and spiritual uses.

(4 credits)

SL-G 350 Plant Biology

The Unity and Diversity of Plant Life — How Organisms from Bacteria to Fungi to Giant Redwoods Nourish, Enrich, and Integrate the Biosphere

Plants, the source of fixed energy for virtually all life forms, are the principal topic of this introductory course. The photosynthetic groups covered range from cyanobacteria through phytoplankton and seaweeds, to bryophytes, lower vascular plants, gymnosperms, and the flowering plants. Non-photosynthetic bacteria, fungi and fungal-like protists are presented as the great integrators and recyclers of nutrients in the global biosphere. Some basic concepts in biochemistry, cell biology, membrane transport, anatomy, and plant ecology, are also included. The course provides a good foundation not only for more advanced topics in biology but also for agriculture.

(Lab fee $120) (4 credits)

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