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MediaCourses72097188Please also see course descriptions for Art courses, Writing courses, Literature courses, and Business Administration courses which can be taken as requirements for the Media and Communications major.

Please see BA Degree Requirements for lists of courses which count towards the degree in Media and Communications.

Core Courses

MC—W250 The Power of the Word

Information and Inspiration for Action and Achievement
In this course, students will be introduced to persuasive communication. Methods of evaluating and responding to arguments will be covered. Students will learn the fundamentals of effective speech, writing and presentation, and examine those fundamentals in the contexts of storytelling, activism, advertising, and business. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits)

MC—W300 Narrative 1

Unifying and Unfolding the Full Range of Human Experience
This course examines the essential role of narrative in the creation of all forms of media. From the very beginnings of human records, whether it is mythology, scripture, literature, or the earliest cave paintings, the creators of these works have always told their audience a story or imparted a message by the use of narrative. In order to work in any creative medium, understanding the various ways in which narrative is used is a great advantage. This course will examine the range of narrative forms and narrative devices that have been used since the dawn of time right up until the modern day. We will discover that although the forms and types of media used might have changed as technology has advanced, in fact, most of the essential forms of narrative used in creative works have been with us for ages. Understanding why will reveal how narrative reflects both the universal and unique aspects of the experience of human life. As part of the course students will be required to undertake projects that aid the development of their own narrative skills. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits)

MC 251 The Power of Media Marketing

Communication in the Global Village
In this course, students will learn to harness the power of media marketing in the Internet age by using social sites — such as YouTube, Google+, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, and LinkedIn — for their current, future or imagined businesses. Students will learn key marketing and branding concepts, and gain hands-on experience with visual marketing and modern content marketing. Topics of exploration include: attraction-based marketing vs. push-based marketing; organizing followers and friends; the visual marketing creation process using, for example, large images and infographics; ecommerce tools for each social site; developing a social media marketing strategy. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisite: basic computer skills

MGT 200 Principles of Business Success

Principles of Marketing, Finance, Operations, Accounting, and Human Resource Management as the Keys to Creating Happiness, Health, and Good Fortune in Business Enterprises This course provides a holistic overview of business for new management majors or students from other majors. Principles of marketing, finance, operations, accounting, and human resources are taught in the perspective of an integrated business strategy and are illustrated by lively examples from videos, case studies, guest speakers, and field trips. (4 credits)

MGT 201 Business Communications Skills

Creating a Frictionless Flow of Communication between Sender and Receiver through Effective Presentations and Writing

Effective communicators are skilled at both informing and inspiring other people. This course provides instruction and practice in making oral and written presentations based on the principle that ideal communication is a frictionless flow that nourishes both sender and receiver. Topics include: word processing and presentation software; library and Internet research skills; oral presentations; writing letters, reports, proposals, and manuals; and the principles of ideal communication. (4 credits) Prerequisite: WTG 192

MGT 230 The Successful Entrepreneur

This course is an introduction to the life of the entrepreneur as told through case studies and personal histories. Topics include: the mindset required of an entrepreneur, how to recognized a good idea for a business, issues in managing people and getting funding, balancing work and family life, entrepreneurship in international business and in the nonprofit sector. (4 credits)

MC 380 Media Projects

Turning Imagination into Reality 
This is a senior project course in which individuals who have taken the courses in Media and Communications come together to envisage and then realize a set of core projects across a range of media. These projects are formulated among the student group with the aid of faculty members. The first stage of the course will be the generation of the project ideas, which can include ideas that utilize a range of media or ideas that are focused on a particular medium. The central goal of the course is for students to apply everything they have learned to these projects. You may be a director on a documentary, an actor in a drama feature, or a producer on a Web-based animation series. There is a wide range of possibilities. You imagine it, and we will make it happen as a team. The idea is to produce great projects that get noticed. Lab fee: $40. (Variable credits — may be repeated for credit) Prerequisites: MGT 200 or MGT 201 or MGT 230 or MC 251; MC—W250; MC—W300; and 12 credits in one of the four concentrations; or consent of the instructor

MC—D370 Digital Publishing and Interactive Design

Connecting Every Part to the Whole 
In this class, students focus on their graphic design skills for online publishing usage. Learn new creative tools, graphic design techniques, and features in Adobe InDesign software. Use InDesign and Digital Publishing Suites to design iPad digital magazine layouts. Understand the different publishing formats such as ePubs, ebooks, and mobi files and their uses. Learn how to create Folios and other publishing documents for iPads, smartphones, e-readers, and other portable devices. Also learn how to create interactive PDFs with hyperlinks, video, article threads, and animation. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisite: basic computer skills

MC—F313 Documentary Filmmaking

Developing the Means to Explore Human Life in All its Diversity and Underlying Unity
Documentary films have their basis in the real world. They are made for a variety of purposes but fundamentally they explore the entire range of human experience. This course will examine the role of documentary filmmaking and all the various forms of the documentary. It will be a fascinating journey that will take students all over the globe and throughout history dealing with a wide range of issues both past and present. In this course, students will also examine how to make a documentary. It is therefore very practical in its focus. The first requirement to any documentary is knowing what the story is and what kind of story makes a good documentary. Having chosen a story, there is then the realization of it. Students will learn what is required to make the all-important pitch. They will then choose some stories and make short documentaries about them. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisites: MC—W300, MC—F282, MC—F284, and MC—F288

MC—F316 Creative Filmmaking

Connecting to Deeper Values of Life through the Power of Integrated Images, Sound, and Composition 
In this course, students will work on their own creative filmmaking project. Various media can be incorporated into this project, such as video, still images, animation and music. This course explores a more intuitive and experimental approach to filmmaking. It is through experimenting with various media that a director of films or other media finds a method of working or an aesthetic that will enhance their future work. In MC—W300 Narrative 1 and MC—F313 Documentary Filmmaking, a more structured narrative-based approach to filmmaking is the emphasis. But all forms of media rely to a greater or lesser degree on purely aesthetic or artistic elements in order to give the final product a certain feel, look, or style. For this reason, regardless of the type of filmmaking one wants to ultimately focus on, it is a good idea to explore the power of images, sound and composition. A feature of the course is looking at the work of various video artists and film directors. By seeing examples of their work we can grow in our appreciation of how images and sound can be put together in a way that induces powerful responses in an audience. Most artists and filmmakers find important sources of inspiration for their own work by examining the work of the masters in the field. We will also examine creative forms of film, animation and other media that are narrative and non-narrative based. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisites: MC—W300, MC—F282, and MC—F284

MC—F423 Feature Film Production 3

Creating Unity from Diversity 
In this class, students assist in video editing, sound mixing, scoring, special effects, and colorization as a member of the post-production team of a feature-length film. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisite: invitation by faculty

MC—F433 RED ONE Camera Projects

Expressing the Deepest Values of Life
This is a senior project course in which students work in teams or individually on media projects that use the RED ONE camera and that contribute significantly to their portfolio. The central goal of the course is for students to apply everything they have learned to these projects. This can be a cooperative venture, so students can be involved in a variety of projects playing different roles on each one. The idea is to produce great projects that get noticed. Students who complete this course at a very high level of achievement will receive an additional certificate marking their achievement with the RED ONE camera. Lab fee: $40. (Variable credits — may be repeated for credit) Prerequisite: consent of the Media and Communications faculty

Digital Arts Courses

MC—D335 Digital Photography 1

Unlocking the Power of Light 
Digital photography helps strengthen the connection between the photographer’s vision and the resulting images by providing nearly instant feedback and furnishing ever-subtler tools for self-expression. In this course, students learn foundational principles that underlie commercial digital photography, while using principles of consciousness to consolidate both the experience and understanding of digital photography. Topics include: mastering the digital camera, managing a digital workflow, color management in theory and practice, visualizing light and how to control it in the digital darkroom. Lab fee: $40. (1–4 credits) Prerequisite: basic computer skills

MC—D336 Travel Photography and Video

Capturing the Essence of the Moment When Traveling

In this class, students will explore and document culture and landscape through the digital photo lens. They will also learn how to take photos for use in stock photography and other commercial photography venues. Fees: Extra expenses for travel, accommodation, meals, etc. (2-4 credits) Prerequisites: consent of course leaders

MC—D363 Web Design Studio

The Convergence of All Media Into a Unified Digital Format 
Students undertake in-depth application of HTML and Cascading Style Sheets along with principles of design for dynamic media in the creation of a portfolio of beautiful, highly functional, standards-compliant, and highly usable Web pages. Topics include: creative approaches to Web design; HTML syntax, tags, attributes, entities, DTDs and validation; HTML5 and CSS3; creating layers of meaning with color, type, and imagery; principles of usability for interactive media; using a visual lexicon for designer-client communication; examples of outstanding Web design studios; homesteading the noosphere. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisite: basic computer skills

MC—D365 Next Generation Web Design

Integrating Graphics, Animation, Video, and Audio to Create Illuminating User Experiences
Students learn to use powerful tools for Web design, Web animation and video to build richly interactive Web sites that inspire the viewer. Topics include: conceptualizing new user experiences; creating innovative Web sites in HTML5 with Web site builders; choosing, building and using WordPress templates. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisite: basic computer skills

MC—D366 Graphic Design for Media and Communications 1

Integrating Medium and Message
This course provides students with the basic practical knowledge and skills needed to create effective visual design using current and critical tools and techniques. Students focus on developing their graphic design skills for personal and professional usage using Photoshop and InDesign. Topics include: digital imaging and page layout tools; principles and elements of visual design; color theory, layout design; basic principles and history of typography; brand design; use of digital photography; and copyright law. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisite: basic computer skills

MC—D367 Graphic Design for Media and Communications 2

In this course students apply critical thinking and creative problem solving skills to branding strategies that meet the needs of diverse clients and businesses. Students will learn to create real-world business proposals and bids for design jobs. The main focus of this course will be creating an overall marketing campaign that includes multiple creative designs. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisite: MC—D366

MC—D368 Graphic Design for the Web

Fast Path to Instantaneous Global Communication 
Students learn a process that allows graphic designers to create Web sites without writing HTML code. This course focuses on understanding the graphic design process of converting Photoshop files into working Web pages. Students learn how to create graphic design web templates and easily turn them into highly functional Web pages using Adobe Muse software. Topics include: layering imagery; the ingredients of interaction; creating elegant, highly interactive Web site content without writing code; video and audio for the Web; defining features; budgets, pricing and the Web design marketplace; and communicating with clients and programmers. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisite: basic computer skills

MC—D370 Digital Publishing and Interactive Design

Connecting Every Part to the Whole 
In this class, students focus on their graphic design skills for online publishing usage. Learn new creative tools, graphic design techniques, and features in Adobe InDesign software. Use InDesign and Digital Publishing Suites to design iPad digital magazine layouts. Understand the different publishing formats such as ePubs, ebooks, and mobi files and their uses. Learn how to create Folios and other publishing documents for iPads, smartphones, e-readers, and other portable devices. Also learn how to create interactive PDFs with hyperlinks, video, article threads, and animation. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisite: basic computer skills

FA 331 Photography 1 — Capturing Moments of Light

Learning the Essentials of the Darkroom and Appreciating Photography as a Tool for Refined Artistic Expression

Students learn to use the photographic medium as a tool for exploring and expressing the finest values of awareness. Students develop their work by learning basic camera techniques and darkroom procedures, while they are also introduced to a broad range of fine art photography. Students must have access to a 35mm camera. May be repeated for credit (with more advanced projects) with permission of the instructor. Lab fee: $150–$200 per course. (1–4 credits) Prerequisite: STC 108/109

FA 332 Photography 2 — Capturing Moments of Light

Developing Photography as a Tool for Refined Artistic Expression

Students learn to use the photographic medium as a tool for exploring and expressing the finest values of awareness. Students develop their work by learning basic camera techniques and darkroom procedures, while they are also introduced to a broad range of fine art photography. Students must have access to a 35mm camera. May be repeated for credit (with more advanced projects) with permission of the instructor. Lab fee: $150–$200 per course. (1–4 credits) Prerequisite: FA 331 or consent of instructor

FA 338 Photography and New Media 1

Exploring the Boundaries of Photography,
Technology and Consciousness

Students explore the basics of digital image-making through traditional photographic  methods (aperture, shutter speed, focus, film speed) while being introduced to a variety of  techniques to manipulate and alter the digital image. The use of scanners, digital cameras, tablets and software programs such as Photoshop and Illustrator, present a powerful capacity for the artist to create an integrated language of self-expression that starts with the photograph. One of the main goals for the course is for the student to become comfortable moving back and forth between digital and real-world, hand-made methods of image-making. Learning to integrate digital techniques with the richness of texture and layers available from real-world materials allows the student to add a level of depth that cannot be achieved with digital techniques alone. The course is structured through a series of short exercises to introduce photography, digital software and digital manipulation techniques. Students then explore a series of work that shows a clear progression and development of techniques and themes. Topics include: digital vs. physical methods of image-making, how the integration of digital and physical methods affect image-making and meaning, image transfer techniques, photo-manipulation techniques. Lab fee: $30. (4 credits)

FA 339 Photography and New Media 2

Integrating Photography, Technology and Consciousness

This course explores the outer boundaries of photography by integrating traditional photography methods (aperture, shutter speed, focus, film speed) with new possibilities presented by using the computer to explore layering, adding text, hand drawing, or other digital manipulation. The use of scanners, digital cameras, tablets and software programs such as Photoshop and Illustrator, present a powerful capacity for the artist to create an integrated language of self-expression that starts with the photograph. Students will
harness the power of both digital tools and physical methods of making to create works that satisfy their artistic aspirations. For example, work could be done mostly in the digital realm while being supplemented and enriched by hand-drawing, scanned items/textures, etc., or the computer could be used just as a way to research and test images that then are created in the physical world. Students explore and refine their creative process in a series of work that shows a clear progression and development of techniques and themes. Topics include: appropriate use of digital techniques, the photograph vs. reality, how meaning relates to methods of image-making, how photo manipulation affects meaning, presentation of work to the public. Lab fee: $50 for materials. (4 credits) Prerequisites: FA 338 or consent of the instructor.

FA 474 Intermediate Studio in Photography

Finding a Personal Voice in the Language of Photography

Students have the opportunity to build on the experience of previous photography courses through the further development and deeper understanding of their own expression using photographic media. The focus of this course is to allow the student to form a strong personal direction and develop a personal conceptual framework in their studio exploration, with the goal of producing a cohesive body of work. Topics include: exploring and refining photographic methods and materials, as well as research in the history and current developments in the field of photography. Lab fee: $150 or more (4 credits) Prerequisites: FA 331, FA 332

Film Courses

MC—F282 Video Production

Understanding and Applying the Aesthetics of Motion Pictures and the Technologies of Digital Video to Transform the World with a Vision of Unbounded Possibilities 
Students learn the basic skills of video production by participating in the production of a variety of different scenes and subjects. They will learn to handle and care for production apparatus including lights, cameras, and sound equipment, and will learn the different roles to be played in the process of shooting a video, including director, director of photography, gaffer, grip, electrician, art department, assistant directors, and production assistants. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisite: basic computer skills

MC—F284 Video Editing

Utilizing Digital Tools for Capturing, Cutting, Sequencing, and Compositing Sound and Image to Create Artistic Wholeness 
Video editing requires the student to be able to synthesize all the different elements of their video into a greater whole. The emphasis of this course is on exploring the craft of editing and the techniques used to maximize the emotional impact of the story. Students will study examples of work by accomplished editors and discover ways to build momentum and render the cut ‘invisible’. Topics include: the language of the cut, the 180-degree system, and Murch’s Rule of Six. Students will become expert in utilizing non-linear editing tools through daily editing assignments. Students will learn keyboard shortcuts and advanced trimming tools, transitions, filters, titles, keyframes, compositing tools, audio mixing, color correction, capturing and outputting. Towards the end of the course some production time will be allotted so that students may edit a final piece of their own. Students may also bring in footage that was shot previously for their final project. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisite: MC—F282

MC—F285 Advanced Video Production

Developing Advanced Teamwork and Technical Skills to Produce Creative Visual Express
Building on the experiences from MC—F282 Video Production, this course is a further exploration of team dynamics and technical skills in the film industry. Returning to the production studio, students study shot composition, camera use, lighting effects, green screen and special effects, fight choreography and stunts, as well as practice the essential skills of Directing, Art Department, Grip and Electric, and Sound. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisite: MC—F282

MC—F286 Stop Motion Animation

Capturing Expressions Of Consciousness With The Digital Lens 
Students in this course will gain knowledge and technical skills to produce a short stopmotion film. They will learn cinematic processes and techniques used to makes static objects appear as if they are moving. Students will practice the fundamentals in all three stages of creating a film: pre-production (storyboarding, timing, sets and characters), production (camera setup, software, lighting, and animation techniques), and postproduction (importing footage, adjusting timing, and removing unwanted frames). Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisite: basic computer skills

MC—F288 Cinematography

Developing Finer Levels of Perception 
Cinematography is the art of telling stories through moving images. By balancing camera angles, movements, and light, cinematographers translate the director’s vision into powerful images. In this course, students will learn the language of cinematography in its technical and aesthetic forms. Fundamentals of camera position and light set ups will be explored. Students will practice camera movements via supported (tripod, jib, dolly, etc.) and handheld techniques, and will learn about the power of the frame in conveying story. Students will understand that clarity of mind, broad vision, and attention to detail are the cinematographer’s greatest assets, and that these develop with the growth of consciousness. Lab Fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisites: MC—F282, MC—F284

MC—F307 3D Cartoon Animation

A World of Art in Motion
Using the free 3D content creation tool Blender, students in this class will explore the expressive possibilities of 3D animation created with software that supports an array of non-photorealistic rendering styles, including cartoon styles, abstract styles, and edge rendering styles, among many others. This software will enable students to tell stories in worlds that appear to be three-dimensional paintings or drawings in motion. The class is open to both beginners and more advanced animators, and will include instruction in the basics of 3D modeling and animation for those who need it. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisite: basic computer skills

MC—F309 3D Animation for Video and Game Design

Creativity in Motion
Student in this class will explore the art and technology of 3D animation. They will use the free 3D content creation suite Blender to build and render 3D animations for video and to create interactive 3D games. Topics include: story-telling; mesh modeling; landscape generation; materials and textures; character creation and rigging; keyframe animation; lights and shadows; fluids and particles; hair and cloth simulations; force fields; game logic with sensors, controllers, and actuators; compositing; and video sequence editing. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisite: basic computer skills

MC—F313 Documentary Filmmaking

Developing the Means to Explore Human Life in All its Diversity and Underlying Unity
Documentary films have their basis in the real world. They are made for a variety of purposes but fundamentally they explore the entire range of human experience. This course will examine the role of documentary filmmaking and all the various forms of the documentary. It will be a fascinating journey that will take students all over the globe and throughout history dealing with a wide range of issues both past and present. In this course, students will also examine how to make a documentary. It is therefore very practical in its focus. The first requirement to any documentary is knowing what the story is and what kind of story makes a good documentary. Having chosen a story, there is then the realization of it. Students will learn what is required to make the all-important pitch. They will then choose some stories and make short documentaries about them. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisites: MC—W300, MC—F282, MC—F284, and MC—F288

MC—F316 Creative Filmmaking

Connecting to Deeper Values of Life through the Power of Integrated Images, Sound, and Composition 
In this course, students will work on their own creative filmmaking project. Various media can be incorporated into this project, such as video, still images, animation and music. This course explores a more intuitive and experimental approach to filmmaking. It is through experimenting with various media that a director of films or other media finds a method of working or an aesthetic that will enhance their future work. In MC—W300 Narrative 1 and MC—F313 Documentary Filmmaking, a more structured narrative-based approach to filmmaking is the emphasis. But all forms of media rely to a greater or lesser degree on purely aesthetic or artistic elements in order to give the final product a certain feel, look, or style. For this reason, regardless of the type of filmmaking one wants to ultimately focus on, it is a good idea to explore the power of images, sound and composition. A feature of the course is looking at the work of various video artists and film directors. By seeing examples of their work we can grow in our appreciation of how images and sound can be put together in a way that induces powerful responses in an audience. Most artists and filmmakers find important sources of inspiration for their own work by examining the work of the masters in the field. We will also examine creative forms of film, animation and other media that are narrative and non-narrative based. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisites: MC—W300, MC—F282, and MC—F284

MC—F318 Music Video

Integration of Sound, Imagine, and Motion 
The Music Video class will enhance the student’s ability to cultivate their own interpretation of sound into sequences of moving images on the screen. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisites: MC—F282 and MC—F284

MC—F319 Promotional Shorts

Utilizing the Principles of Visual Communications to Influence the Habits of Society in Order to Live in a Better World 
In this class, students will be able to explore and learn the different visual and audio techniques that companies use to persuade their targeted audiences. Using these techniques, students will work in small groups to develop effective storyboards and creative dialogues to produce their own 30-second video commercials. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisites: MC—F282 and MC—F284

MC—F323 Advanced Video Editing

Compositing, Animating and Color
This is an advanced level course that focuses on color grading, compositing (layering multiple images), animating (changing these layers so they fly, grow or fade over time), and all of the finishing touches that will make your video projects appear both polished and visually exciting. After in-class tutorials, students will apply these tools to any previous video project or new creative project of their conceiving. Projects might include, for example, creating a film look for your video with color grading, creating an animated opening credits sequence, creating customized Lower Thirds, or creating your own 3D environment. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisite: MC—F284

MC—F324 Visual Effects

Imagination and Reality
Students will learn to use the powerful, free, 3D software package Blender for visual effects and compositing, and then will integrate some of those effects into their video projects from previous classes or into new video projects they create especially for this class. Topics include: compositing 3D animation with live-action video; simulations of water, light, fire, explosions, smoke, and rigid body physics; animated particle systems; camera tracking; object tracking. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisite: basic computer skills

MC—F421 Feature Film Production 1

Preparation for Action 
In this class, students join the key production team during the pre-production phase of a feature-length film. They help design and create sets, costumes and props, or assist in the essential organization of location scouting, scheduling and budget management. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisite: invitation by faculty

MC—F422 Feature Film Production 2

Skill in Action
Students join the crew of a feature-length film in production. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisite: invitation by faculty

MC—F423 Feature Film Production 3

Creating Unity from Diversity 
In this class, students assist in video editing, sound mixing, scoring, special effects, and colorization as a member of the post-production team of a feature-length film. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisite: invitation by faculty

MC—F425 Advanced Film Projects

Collective Creativity 
Students will learn and apply advanced filmmaking skills by assisting David Lynch MA in Film students in producing their MA films. Students may work on pre-production tasks such as fundraising, casting, location scouting, and set design, or they may undertake tasks during principal photography, working as actors, cinematographers, assistant directors, audio technicians, production assistants, and/or in other roles. Lab fee: $40. (Variable credits — may be repeated for credit) Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

MC—F431 Cinematography with the RED ONE Camera

Realizing Your Vision From the Deepest Level 
In this course, students will learn to use the RED ONE camera, a digital camera with image resolution high enough to be used for shooting cinema release feature films. Students who complete this course at a high level of achievement will receive a RED ONE certificate that means it is possible for them to use the camera in designated RED ONE production classes and projects. There are high standards for this class, and students will need to demonstrate competence and reliability in order to get this certificate. Students will also learn how to shoot with a professional digital camera. This means learning how to compose shots. What are the different ways cinematographers can shoot a dramatic scene? What is the best way to shoot a documentary? Students will learn all the different types of shots. The class will also look at the work of different directors and see how they go about filming their subjects. This course and its certification will be a boon for students when applying for jobs or advancing their careers. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisites: MC—F282 and MC 285, or consent of the Media and Communications faculty

MC—F432 Lighting and the RED ONE Camera

Illuminating Scenes with Meaning and Subtle Nuance 
Students in this class deepen their skills using the RED ONE camera with a particular emphasis on using lighting and exposure to enhance the expressive power and subtlety of each scene. The class will center on video production projects that include in-depth exploration of the qualities of light, placement and filtering of light sources, 3-point lighting, and other lighting strategies. Students who complete this course at a very high level of achievement will receive an additional certificate marking their achievement with the RED ONE camera. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisite: MC—F431, or consent of the Media and Communications faculty

MC—F433 RED ONE Camera Projects

Expressing the Deepest Values of Life
This is a senior project course in which students work in teams or individually on media projects that use the RED ONE camera and that contribute significantly to their portfolio. The central goal of the course is for students to apply everything they have learned to these projects. This can be a cooperative venture, so students can be involved in a variety of projects playing different roles on each one. The idea is to produce great projects that get noticed. Students who complete this course at a very high level of achievement will receive an additional certificate marking their achievement with the RED ONE camera. Lab fee: $40. (Variable credits — may be repeated for credit) Prerequisite: consent of the Media and Communications faculty

Music Courses

MC—M232 Sound Design for Visual Media

Creating Audio-Visual Wholeness
In this course students will dive deep into the auditory world of sound design for visual media. We will analyze, explore and break down the fundamental categories of Dialog, Sound Effects, & Music/Score that when accompanying visual media will bring a sense of wholeness to the creative project. This class will offer each student the opportunity to work in a controlled live recording environment where they will learn how to perform and record ADR, Foley, walla, and music/score. Throughout the course students will gain detailed knowledge of dialog editing, cueing, and sound effects, giving each student a solid foundation to continue their growth in sound design for visual media. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisite: basic computer skills

MC—M233 Digital Music Production

Waves of Creativity
With modern music recording and production being more accessible than ever, anyone with a computer can share the melodies in their head with the world. Be it a symphony or the next number one hit single, students will learn to use music creation software to make their dreams come true. Minor knowledge of music preferred. Students will learn basic compositional techniques as well as production and sound engineering methods to bring as much clarity to their vision as possible. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisite: basic computer skills

MC—M330 Radio and Web Broadcasting

Informing, Educating, and Transforming the World with a Vision of Unbounded Possibilities 
This is a practical course, emphasizing hands-on production for radio and Web broadcasting. Student will research, write, record, produce and edit original radio projects. Students may work on journalistic or creative projects with a commercial or non-commercial orientation. They will develop on-air skills such as presenting, reporting, and interviewing. Sound is a powerful form of expression; through sound alone we can tell a story which moves an audience or takes them to another world by stimulating their imagination. The creative power as well as the story telling power of radio will therefore be fully explored in this course. A unique feature of this course is that it offers students the opportunity of broadcasting their radio projects on KRUU-FM. Lab fee $40. (4 credits) Prerequisite: basic computer skills

Writing Courses

MC—W215 Journalism 1

Communications for the Public Good
This course will prepare students to write nonfiction stories for publication. Students will understand the importance of reporting and ethics, learn AP style, and examine the formats of traditional and new media outlets. During the course, students will generate story ideas, collect information through research and interviews, fact check, and then compose final copy for a variety of news stories. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits)

MC—W245 Writing for the Screen

From Idea to Image
Students will be introduced to the process of preparing a story to be told in a visual medium. Students will learn the basics of script and screenplay writing by participating in basic skills exercises, including dialogue emulation and performance, script-to-screen analysis, and scene adaptation. To produce effective screenplays, students will develop their own toolkit for overcoming challenges in idea conception, story structure, and dialogue. Course work will result in scripts suitable for production in later courses. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits)

MC—W250 CCTS The Power of the Word

Information and Inspiration for Action and Achievement
In this course, students will be introduced to persuasive communication. Methods of evaluating and responding to arguments will be covered. Students will learn the fundamentals of effective speech, writing and presentation, and examine those fundamentals in the contexts of storytelling, activism, advertising, and business. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits)

MC—W252 The Power of Imagination

This is a writing course that looks at the power of the human imagination and its role in fiction writing. The first part of the course will examine the function of imagination in human evolution and what parts of our physiology are involved with imagination. We will then look at some of the most imaginative writing that has been produced and how imagination plays a crucial role in the ability of the writer to create compelling and enriching narrative prose. We will discover that imagination is at the very core of the creative process and therefore developing our imaginative abilities will greatly enhance and develop the power of our writing. Throughout the course students will engage in exercises to express their imagination and develop great imaginative power. Students on the course will also undertake a writing project for the course, and there will be writing days to work on this project. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits)

MC—W300 Narrative 1

Unifying and Unfolding the Full Range of Human Experience
This course examines the essential role of narrative in the creation of all forms of media. From the very beginnings of human records, whether it is mythology, scripture, literature, or the earliest cave paintings, the creators of these works have always told their audience a story or imparted a message by the use of narrative. In order to work in any creative medium, understanding the various ways in which narrative is used is a great advantage. This course will examine the range of narrative forms and narrative devices that have been used since the dawn of time right up until the modern day. We will discover that although the forms and types of media used might have changed as technology has advanced, in fact, most of the essential forms of narrative used in creative works have been with us for ages. Understanding why will reveal how narrative reflects both the universal and unique aspects of the experience of human life. As part of the course students will be required to undertake projects that aid the development of their own narrative skills. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits)

MC—W342 Global Solutions

Global Solutions is a journalism and change maker course that looks at the leading global issues that are reported in the world’s press and then progresses to examine how these issues can be addressed and positive change brought about. All journalists know that after a period of time covering the issues of the day, simply exposing what is happening is not enough; change in policy and exercise of dynamic solutions need to be applied. This course looks at what the media can do to bring about change and then goes deeper and looks at the ways in which solutions can be developed on a global scale. Some of the big issues of the day we will discuss are income inequality, access to education, food security, climate change, poverty, sustainability and access to political representation. As part of this we will discover that often what we believe is true about these issues is not accurate and that wrong information is part of the problem. One example being the belief that global population is increasing at unsustainable levels—the actual predictions might surprise you. There are many such examples. Lively debate and discussions of the best solutions to these issues will be the engine of this course. If you want to be a change maker—get on board for the ride!

MC—W345 Creative Process

Curving Back Onto My Own Nature, I Create Again and Again  
In Creative Process, students study their own creative process as well as what artists, writers, and filmmakers have shared about creative inspiration. The purpose of this class is to break boundaries and rediscover an easy relationship with the inner Muse. The primary textbook is The Artist’s Way by Julia Cameron. The Syllabus Reader contains material by a wide range of authors such as Annie Dillard, Jorge Luis Borges, Eudora Welty, Ann Patchett, Patricia Hampl, William Saroyan, John Ciardi, Frank Conroy, Virginia Woolf, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, Thomas Wolfe, William Stafford, Rainer Maria Rilke, Lu Chi, Mark Strand, Jane Hirshfield, Billy Collins, Elizabeth Gilbert, plus interviews with great authors by Bill Moyers and material from creativity experts Anne Lamott and Natalie Goldberg. A variety of guest lecturers working in different media will come to the class to discuss their work, career paths, and creative process. Students will keep a daily journal and engage in various creative projects during the course. As a final project, students produce a portfolio and can choose to participate in a group installation/exhibit on creativity. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisite: ART, LIT, WTG or MC major, or permission of instructor

MC—W350 Advanced Writing for the Screen

This course continues to develop the student’s tool-kit for tackling hard writing problems in the creation of scripts for video, web-video and film. Areas covered may include: kinds of characters, writing routine, research and development, world building, visual metaphor, realism in dialogue, and pacing in character arch and story arch. $40 Lab fee (4 units) Prerequisite: MC—W245

MC—W410 Narrative 2

The Quest for the Essential Truths of Human Existence 
This course will go deeper into some of the key aspects of narrative. It will also be more like a writer’s workshop. This means there will be time to develop ideas, novels or scripts that a writer is working on or wants to begin during the course. We will be having lectures from writers and other speakers in the business who will share their expertise with us. The course will also introduce the element of performance. Those students who wish to can learn how to perform their work or the work of others. This helps with understanding how the written word becomes a performance. The performance part of the course is optional for students. Key aspects that we will go deeper into are: developing characters, style, plot development, genre, symbolism, and improving our chances of being published. The profound connection between writing and development of consciousness will also be explored. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisite: MC—W300

WTG 201 Poetry and Transcendence

Poetry can express the unsayable and touch upon the intangible. Throughout the ages, mystics have used the language of poetry to give voice to longing, devotion, and the exaltation of consciousness. This course focuses on great mystical poets of all time: Lao Tzu, Rumi, Hafez, Mirabai, Lalla, Hadewijch, St. John of the Cross, Romantics Blake and Keats, American visionaries Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson, and more. The course also explores modern and contemporary poets whose work explores transcendence in subject and/or form — among others Rainer Maria Rilke, Pablo Neruda, Octavio Paz, Thomas Tranströmer, A. R. Ammons, Charles Wright, Tony Hoagland, Pattiann Rogers, and Mary Oliver. Students create a portfolio of their own transcendental poetry, practicing open and traditional forms, including the ghazal, pantoum, villanelle, and chant. Focus is on techniques that evoke transcendental experience — sound devices, repetition, figures of speech — as well as the relationship between words and white space, sound and silence. In this course, students learn to “see into the life of things,” as Wordsworth put it, “with an eye made quiet by the power / of harmony.” (4 credits) Prerequisite: WTG 192 or consent of the instructor

WTG 202 Fiction 1

Emulating Nature’s Own Creative Process — Creating, Developing, Structuring, and Refining Works of Short Narrative Fiction

Fiction writing is among the most satisfying forms of artistic and personal expression. A fiction writer writes from the heart as well as the mind, but good fiction is much more than “disguised autobiography.” To excel at this craft, students need to learn the arts of creating plot and character, fashion an appropriate point-of-view, and control style and tone. For inspiration and guidance we will read some of the world’s finest writers of fiction. (4 credits) Prerequisite: WTG 192 or consent of instructor

WTF 301 Literary Nonfiction Workshop 1

Creative writing is often mistakenly associated solely with fiction and poetry, but some of the best creative writing is found in nonfiction. Whatever writers put their attention on is filled with their own originality. In these courses, students read beautiful and moving selections of nonfiction prose and examine them for their grace, clarity, and effectiveness. Students then write their own nonfiction projects that could include essays, interviews, reviews, and other forms. (4 credits) Prerequisite: WTG 192 or consent of the instructor

WTG 302 Literary Nonfiction Workshop 2

Creative writing is often mistakenly associated solely with fiction and poetry, but some of the best creative writing is found in nonfiction. Whatever writers put their attention on is filled with their own originality. In these courses, students read beautiful and moving selections of nonfiction prose and examine them for their grace, clarity, and effectiveness. Students then write their own nonfiction projects that could include essays, interviews, reviews, and other forms. (4 credits) Prerequisite: WTG 192 or consent of the instructor

WTG 310 Poetry Writing

This introductory course explores the basic building blocks of craft and technique in poetry—imagery, figurative language, sound devices, rhyme, rhythm, repetition, meter, point of view, and form. Textbook is Frances Mayes’ The Discovery of Poetry: A Field Guide to Reading and Writing Poems. Students also memorize poetry using Saved by a Poem by Kim Rosen, which explores the healing and transformative properties of speaking poetry out loud. This course draws on works by a great variety of modern and contemporary poets, including Elizabeth Bishop, Ted Kooser, Billy Collins, Dorianne Laux, Jane Hirshfield, Peter Everwine, Li-Young Lee, Charles Wright, Wislawa Szymborska, Naomi Shihab Nye, and more. Through workshops, exercises, feedback and discussion, students hone craft and technique while creating a portfolio of original work, which includes traditional as well as open form poetry. The highlight of the course is a public reading. (4 credits) Prerequisite: WTG 192 or consent of the instructor

WTG 313 Writing and Reading the Short Story

Exploring the Dynamics between Wholeness and Point

Edgar Allen Poe once stated that everything in a short story works toward a “single effect.” Economy and precision of language make the short story the perfect narrative form. In this course we will read and study intriguing stories such as Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s “The Very Old Man with Enormous Wings” and Eudora Welty’s “Why I Live at the P.O.” as models for short fiction we will write. We will also look closely at elements of fiction: character, structure, point of view, imagery, and figurative language as building blocks for our own stories. Students will write three short stories and workshop those stories in class. (4 credits) Prerequisite: WTG 192 or consent of instructor

WTG 314 Fiction 2

The Divine at Every Point

This course advances techniques learned in Fiction 1. Fiction writing is among the most satisfying forms of artistic and personal expression. A fiction writer writes from the heart as well as the mind, but good fiction is much more than “disguised autobiography.” To excel at this craft, students need to learn the arts of creating plot and character, fashion an appropriate point-of-view, and control style and tone. For inspiration and guidance we will read some of the world’s finest writers of fiction. (4 credits) Prerequisite: WTG 192 or consent of the instructor

WTG 315 Writing Literary Nonfiction

Expressing the Truth that Transcends Facts with the Power, Grace, and Insight of Fiction

During the second half of the twentieth century, creative nonfiction — called “the new literature” — has steadily grown in popularity. Reading such writers as Tom Wolfe, Peter Mathiessen, and John McPhee, students discover the potential of nonfiction to elicit an aesthetic response equal to that of the novel. In this course, students learn to combine techniques of journalism and fiction in writing their own creative nonfiction. (4 credits) Prerequisite: WTG 192 or consent of the instructor

WTG 320 The Personal Essay

Examining Experience from One’s Own Self-Referral Perspective — The Memoir and Other Forms

The personal essay celebrates heart and mind, exploring age-old questions about the human experience. Students learn the history of the personal essay, reading examples of personal prose discussion in Oriental and classical Literature, then tracing the origins of the modern essay tradition to the European Renaissance with the work of Michel de Montaigne. Students learn about the range and freedom of this brief “formless form” by acquainting themselves with modern and contemporary masters: Mark Twain, Virginia Woolf, Zora Neale Hurston, Jorge Luis Borges, Flannery O’Connor, Annie Dillard, David Sedaris, Dave Eggers, Amy Tan, Mark Spragg, and more. The class also focuses on experimental, contemporary hybrids, tracing the relationship between the personal essay and flash nonfiction, the lyric essay, the “hermit crab” essay, and prose poetry. Students are encouraged to keep a daily journal in which they record memories, observations, insights, and reflections. Students also create a substantial portfolio of at least three personal essays, learning about prewriting, drafting, and revision in the process. Students are encouraged to find a natural, authentic personal voice that is intimate, yet not self-indulgent. In the specificity of personal reflection, it is possible to touch upon the universality of human experience. (4 credits) Prerequisite: WTG 192 or consent of instructor

WTG 321 Blogging and Reflective Writing

Want to speak to the world and feel you need more than the Comment space on Facebook allows? Blogging can offer a platform from which to share your thoughts with a larger audience. This course will explain how to set up your own blog site and help you produce your first postings for the site. Drawing on personal feelings, opinions, memories, and insights, we’ll use reflective writing to channel those experiences into expressive prose to share with our readers. Then we’ll post our thoughts to share with the world. (4 credits) Prerequisite: WTG 192 or consent of the instructor

WTG 322 Memoir Writing

In this course, students are exposed to childhood memoir, graphic memoir (memoir in cartoon form or illustrated memoir), travel or journey memoir, eyewitness account, lyric and mosaic memoir, and more. Attention is given to the history of the memoir as well as to experimental techniques and contemporary hybrid forms. Students read selections from memoirs by authors such as Sei Shonagon, Frank McCourt, Janet Frame, Bill Bryson, David Sedaris, Annie Dillard, Shoba Narayan, Anne Patchett, Mark Spragg, and Yang Erche Namu. The main textbook is Tell It Slant by Brenda Miller and Suzanne Paola, which explores the craft and technique of memoir writing in-depth. Old Friend from Far Away by Natalie Goldberg provides students with useful writing prompts for their journals. Students create their own portfolio — a series of linked or unlinked memoir essays or the opening chapter(s) of a book-length manuscript. Ultimately, students learn to stand back and — in the words of Anaïs Nin — consciously experience their life twice, “in the moment and in retrospection.” (4 credits) Prerequisite: WTG 192 or consent of the instructor

WTG 323 Memoir and Transcendence

Knowing the Self

In this course, students explore memoir with a focus on the theme of transcendence — transcendental moments, spiritual quest, stories about overcoming obstacles and transformation, seeing the extraordinary in the ordinary, explorations of the uncharted territories of consciousness. Central is the craft of memoir writing, particularly techniques that encourage transcendence. Also covered are the history of the memoir and contemporary experimental forms. Students are exposed to internationally acclaimed memoirists whose work has a transcendental slant — among others Kenko, Annie Dillard, Henry David Thoreau, Isak Dinesen, Helen Nearing, Azar Nafisi, Chet Raymo, Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni, and Etty Hillesum. Textbooks are Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert and Inventing the Truth, edited by William Zinsser. Students keep a journal and write a portfolio of memoir essays, exploring their life experiences to transcendental depths, getting to know their own Self on every level. In the words of Alan Shapiro, writing memoir sublimates transient identity in “the rapture of complete attentiveness. … In that extended moment, opposites cohere: the mind feels and the heart thinks, and receptivity’s a form of fierce activity.” (4 credits) Prerequisite: WTG 192 or consent of the instructor

WTG 340 Writers on Writing

Examining Experience from One’s Own Self-Referral Perspective — The Memoir and Other Forms

Students read and discuss a range of essayists from earlier traditions to such contemporary essayists as David Sedaris or Vowell. Writing in this form, each student develops his or her personal voice. Students also discover the power of short prose to transform topics of individual concern into expanded visions of wholeness. (4 credits) Prerequisite: WTG 192 or consent of instructor

WTG 342 Writing for Children 1

Writing for children can be as rewarding as writing for adults and just as challenging. Children are becoming more sophisticated at younger ages and enjoy reading books at their intelligence level. Students in this class will learn to find the appropriate subject matter, language, tone, and structure for the age group they are addressing. Students will start out writing pieces for preschoolers and early elementary grades and, afterwards, develop more complex narratives for adolescents and young adults. (4 credits) Prerequisite: WTG 192 or consent of the instructor

WTG 345 Nature Writing

The greatest issue of our time is the preservation of the world we inhabit for our own and future generations. As a result, this topic has become one of the most engaging of today’s writers, evolving into its own genre, its own literary type. The fathers of this genre are, of course, Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau who passed the torch to writers such as John Muir, the founder of the Sierra Club, and Rachel Carson who penned the famous ecological work Silent Spring. In more recent years it has been carried by writers like Annie Dillard, Farley Mowat, John McPhee, Barbara Kingsolver, and Barry Lopez to name but a few. The one constant in all forms of nature writing is an abiding love of nature, but beyond that it can take many forms. In this course, we will read a number of different kinds of essays and we will write three of our own that may include an encounter with a wild animal, an ecological essay, and a personal essay about a transcendental communion with nature. (4 credits) Prerequisite: WTG 192 or consent of the instructor

WTG 350 Advanced Poetry Workshop

Creating Harmony of Sound and Coherence of Meaning

Maharishi says, “Poets start with what the eyes see, the ears hear and the hands feel, then travel into space and time to explore the beyond, tracking the path of transcending.” This course offers advanced students the opportunity to profoundly hone craft and technique by focusing on a serious body of work in the genre of poetry. This course is usually held in April during National Poetry month so that students can attend public readings frequently. Students will familiarize themselves in-depth with the contemporary canon, using the work of contemporaries to analyze the precise mechanics of form, line break, punctuation, sound devices, imagery, figurative language, point of view, and more. Textbook is The Poet’s Companion: a Guide to the Pleasures of Writing Poetry by Kim Addonizio and Dorianne Laux. Part of this course is a workshop; students will continually receive feedback on their work from peers as well faculty, then spend considerable time on revision. The final portfolio in this class should be of publishable quality. The procedures for submitting work for publication will be discussed at length, and at the end of this course, students are required to submit some of their poetry to a magazine or contest of choice. The culminating event of the course will be a public reading. (4 credits) Prerequisite: WTG 192, WTG 201 or WTG 310 or permission of instructor

WTG 360 Writing and Photography

Expressing Light Into Words 

This course teaches the basics of digital photography and how to write about it. Students learn how to adjust the digital “negative” in an image-editing program such as Adobe Photoshop. Students keep a daily journal of their photographic experiences, learn to photograph and write about the environment, and produce a photo essay on their favorite topic. For daily printing needs, students use online sources, such as Snapfish or Shutterfly. The course also includes at least one field trip and a variety of creative photographic assignments. For the final portfolio, students select their best photographs to enlarge and learn how to print and mat them. Requirements: a $25 fee for materials and at least a 7-megapixel camera with zoom lens and manual controls; this means the ability to manually adjust shutter speed and aperture size. (4 credits) Prerequisite: WTG 192 or consent of the instructor

WTG 370 Writing for Fun and Profit

Niche Markets

This is a course for students who would like experience in professional writing for niche publishing markets, such as educational testing. We’ll explore a variety of markets and in detail: the educational testing market. For that market, we’ll focus on the compactness and concision necessary for writing test passages, the necessity for selecting topics appropriate for testing and recognizing sensitivity issues, mastering editing skills necessary to create grammatical and mechanical correctness, as well developing an eye for topics that will appeal to the appropriate grade level. The course will include a professional workshop with a testing development specialist, the possibility of a follow-up internship with American College Testing in Iowa City, and freelance writing opportunities. (4 credits) Prerequisite: WTG 192 or consent of the instructor

WTG 373 Graphic Narrative

The Graphic Novel

Graphic narrative — a genre of literature combining writing and art — has become increasingly popular in the past decades. The term “graphic novel” broadly refers to any fictional or non-fictional story that is told by means of both writing and illustration — often, though not necessarily, in cartoon form. In this class, students will read selections from various award-winning graphic novels and memoirs, among them Logicomix by Apostolos Doxiadis and Christos Papadimitriou, Persepolis by Marjane Sarpati, Blankets by Craig Thompson, and the Pulitzer Prize winning Maus by Art Spiegelman. Students will also examine non-cartoon pairing of text and illustration in works such as Principles of Uncertainty by Maira Kalman and The Tenaciously Sane Adventures of a Noman by artist and painter Toc Fetch. Students are expected to write and illustrate their own graphic narratives during the class, studying craft and technique relevant to the genre with help of the textbook Making Comics by Scott McCloud. Writing-wise, the focus will be on dialogue, scene, plot, pacing, character development, selection of detail, language, voice, and editing. Artistically, the focus will be on choice of materials, drawing technique, page layout, and the relationship between positive and negative space, color, and shape. Aside from an instructor trained in Creative Writing, this course has a T.A. trained in Cartoon Studies and Art. (4 credits) Prerequisite: WTG 192 or consent of the instructor

WTG 375 Flash Fiction

Crystalized Visions

In this course, students will explore the art of flash fiction and create a portfolio of miniature stories (100 to 700 words per story). Flash fiction, once marginal, has now gained mainstream acceptance and is also known as microfiction, microstories, miniatures, short-shorts, short short stories, very short stories, prose poetry, postcard fiction, sudden fiction, and nanofiction. The form takes the popular writer’s adage less is more quite seriously, giving students the opportunity to create dynamic, compact, and highly polished jewels in a relatively short space of time. Gesturing toward the transcendent, liberatory capacity of the form, flash fiction exponent Stuart Dybek states, “Within the constraint of their small boundaries the writer discovers great freedom.” Students will read selections from works by famous and lesser-known exponents of the form: Yasunari Kawabata, Gertrude Stein, Lydia Davis, James Wright, Stuart Dybek, Luis Cernuda, Charles Simic, Margaret Atwood, and others. Students will be encouraged to playfully experiment with the form and discover for themselves if it is “rugged enough to adapt itself to the lyrical impulses of the soul, the undulations of the psyche, the prickings of consciousness” as stated by French poet and art critic Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), a critical founding figure of the form. (4 credits) Prerequisite: WTG 192 or consent of the instructor

WTG 399 Directed Study

(variable credits) Prerequisite: consent of the Department faculty and the Academic Standards Committee

WTG 410 Travel Writing

Discovering the Universal in the Particular — Conveying the Sense of Feeling at Home in Unique Places of the World

From Mark Twain to John Steinbeck, many of the world’s greatest writers have been drawn to travel writing. As Marcel Proust put it, “The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes.” This travel-writing course teaches students how to perceive the familiar in a new way, finding points of interest in and around the state of Iowa. The class will go on several daytrips, and if possible a longer weekend trip to a city within a 4-hour radius of Fairfield. On these trips, students research and gather material for travel articles and essays that can range from the formal (objective) to the informal (subjective). Focus options of travel articles may be: destination, journey, special interest, “roundup” themes, historical or holiday, side trip, outdoor/recreation, news, humor, travel advice, food and travel, or personal experience. Students learn about the craft and technique of travel writing from discussions and from the textbook, L. Peat O’Neil’s Travel Writing, which outlines interviewing techniques, ways to write a good hook, how to research, how to write a successful pitch or query, the best markets for travel articles, etc. Students are expected to submit one article for publication to regional magazine The Iowa Source or another suitable publication. In the end, students learn that travel writing is not so much about place as about the travel writer, since travel experience is most interesting when filtered through an astute and perceptive individual consciousness. (4 credits) Prerequisite: WTG 192 or consent of the instructor

Additional Courses

MC 336 Social Entrepreneurship

Solving Problems from the Level of Infinite Creativity

This project-based class challenges students to employ every ounce of their creativity and apply their knowledge to finding solutions to the world’s most challenging problems, whether local or global, in the area of environmental sustainability, education, communications, or business. Each week we will connect with and learn from social entrepreneurs from around the world working in education, mobile technology, community development and so forth, and draw inspiration from their relentless vision and determination. Through the study of innovations in the social sector, we will develop an understanding of core principles and tactics of social change as well as the necessary leadership qualities of social entrepreneurs. Students will work individually or in groups to conceive of a social intervention of their own design. Students will present their plans, models and media to a committee to evaluate the potential of their work to create social change. (2-4 credits)

MC 385 Advanced Media Projects

Communicating from the Deepest Level
In this course, students have a chance to further develop their skills, their understanding, and their portfolio by completing advanced media projects in video, Web design, graphic design, music and/or professional writing. Students may also work on a research essay in the field of their study in order to further develop their critical thinking and research skills. Lab fee: $40. (Variable credits — may be repeated for credit) Prerequisite: MC 380 or consent of the Media and Communications faculty

MC 390 Portfolio

This course gives guidance to graduating students on how to build a comprehensive portfolio and begin focusing on applying for careers in the media field. Students will develop a strategic self-promotion plan that will help their professional development. They will learn to develop their presentation skills in writing and in person, while also understanding some job-seeking techniques for getting hired. They will also create an online portfolio as well as a resume and career profile summary. The portfolio creation process will consist of collecting, categorizing and showcasing any work from previous courses or personal projects. (4 credits) Prerequisites: MGT 200 or MGT 201 or MGT 230 or MC 251; MC—W250; MC—W300; and 12 credits in one of the four concentrations; or consent of the instructor

MC 398 Internship in Media and Communications

Integration of Knowledge and Action
Students gain practical experience working for a commercial or nonprofit organization in a communications or media related field, such as video production, film production, radio broadcasting, Web design, graphic design, advertising, public relations, or journalism. Students document their growth in understanding and experience in journals. Fieldwork must be completed at least two months before graduation. (Variable credits — may be repeated for credit) Prerequisites: major in Media and Communications and consent of the Media and Communications faculty and Academic Standards Committee

MC 399 Directed Study

(Variable credits — may be repeated for credit) Prerequisite: consent of the Media and Communications faculty.

FA 201 Art and Nature

Expressing Art from the Source of Natural Law through Interdisciplinary Exploration of the Beauty and Wonder of Nature

Students gain an appreciation for the mechanics of creation as experienced in the natural world and within the realm of one’s own awareness as they engage in creative expression and the making of art. Through the experience of an ongoing interdisciplinary project, inspired by their observation of nature, students prepare a unique aesthetic presentation. Topics include —drawing from nature, photographing nature, design and camouflage, math in nature, music in nature, the language of nature — Sanskrit, perceptual exercises, bird-watching, and earth and environmental artists, including Goldsworthy, Long, and the Harrisons. Materials fee: $35. (4 credits)

FA 203 Understanding Art and Media

Culturing Aesthetic Sensibility by Appreciating and Creating Art as an Expression of the Heart, Mind and Universal Self

Art and media are crystallizations of consciousness. This course cultures a deep appreciation for the arts through intellectual knowledge and direct experience. Slide lectures, discussions, readings, and workshops reveal that art is structured in the multilayered consciousness of the artist and the audience, and in the collective consciousness of the culture. The greatest art works give glimpses of the goal of all creativity — the universal Self in higher states of consciousness — and thus continue to inspire people throughout time. Topics include: the fundamentals of art — creativity, form, function, and symbolism; the great achievements of sacred art; archetypes of consciousness in the arts; and traditional and contemporary approaches to evaluating and interpreting art. Course includes field trips to art museums and an artist’s gallery. Field trip fee: $50. (4 credits)

FA 204 CCTS: The Spiritual Quest in Media and Myth

The Spiritual Quest in Media, Myth, and Myself—The Hero’s Journey as the Development of Consciousness

Students explore their own spiritual quest in the light of the wisdom shared in great mythic stories, focusing on epics, mythology, and modern films. Drawing upon the insights of scholars of myth like Joseph Campbell, students identify the universal stages of the quest archetype: the hero’s journey as he or she evolves to higher states of awareness. Students critically evaluate theories of consciousness and analyze how they can illuminate mythic stories and their own life. In the culminating course project, students create their own mythic stories that reflect their personal vision and the transformation of consciousness. Topics include: the power of myth, archetypal characters and events, the love story archetype, the inspiration of ancient epics and myths, adapting ancient stories to modern situations, plot structure and character development. Textbook fee: $20 (4 credits) Prerequisites: STC 108, taken during students’ first semester or with consent of the Department faculty

MGT 378 Marketing Management

Creating a Positive Influence to Attract, Satisfy, and Retain Customers
Marketing is the process of creating exchanges that satisfy individual and organizational objectives. Topics include consumer behavior, market research, market segmentation, competitive positioning and strategy, advertising, pricing, distribution and channel management, selling techniques and sales force management, and new product development. Students conduct an industry analysis and write the marketing section for their business plan. (4 credits) Prerequisites: WTG 192

MGT 428 Business Law and Ethics

Learning to Act in Accord with Natural and National Law— Supporting Business Interactions through Contracts, Torts, and Agency Law

Law is a tool of progress. It creates the legal form of the business and enables business people to communicate clearly. It facilitates their commercial relationships and averts problems before they arise. Familiarity with business law and the natural laws upon which it is based promotes success for the individual and society. Topics include contracts, torts, agency, bankruptcy, secured transactions and property (real, personal, and intellectual property.) Students learn to select the most appropriate form of organization for their business and draft simple contracts. (4 credits)

MGT 484 Mediation and Negotiation

Utilizing the Deepest Principles of Human Nature to Create Win-Win Solutions

This course is a survey of negotiation, mediation, and arbitration methods of resolving disputes without litigation. Students gain practical negotiation skills through workshops and case studies. Topics include understanding other parties, building a productive framework for negotiation, defining objectives and strategy, framing proposals, and finding “win/win” solutions. (2–4 credits)

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