Visit Us Apply Request Info Navigation Close
Maharishi Universityof Management

Degree Requirements

To graduate with a BS in Computer Science, students must successfully complete:

Required Courses (56 credits)

This course introduces the fundamental concepts related to computer programming, preparing students with the skills to write basic computer programs, and the knowledge to understand basic programs written by others. Topics include: built-in data types, flow control using conditionals and loops, arrays, console I/O, static methods, recursion, using libraries, and using classes to create your own data types. (4 credits) Prerequisite: MATH 162
This course covers programming in Java, specifically focusing on object oriented concepts and creating GUI applications. Topics include: classes and objects, primitives and references, inheritance and polymorphism, interfaces and abstract classes, exception handling, GUI programming in Swing, and serialization and file I/O. (4 credits) Prerequisite: CS 201
Students use computer programming laboratory problems to apply the principles of data structure organization in a practical environment and develop advanced programming skills. The organizing power of knowledge is found to be the source of order in computer data structures. Topics include: abstract data types, internal representation of data, stacks, queues, linked lists, hash maps, binary trees, heaps, red-black trees, 3-4 trees and B trees. (4 credits) Prerequisite: CS 203
Students are introduced to the study algorithms. Topics include: searching and sorting algorithms, computing time of programs and representations and algorithms for graphs. This course also includes a significant research paper around the efficiencies and running times of different algorithms. (4 credits) Prerequisite: CS 221
This course presents the internal structure of a computer, an introduction to assembly language, and the design of digital logic circuits and their use in structuring the various functional components of a computer, such as the memory and central processing unit. Topics include: machine organization, logic gates, circuits, machine language, assembly language, memory, I/O systems, and how these all combine to create typical and atypical architectures. (4 credits) Prerequisite: CS 201 and CS 272 / MATH 272
This course involves substantial programming exercises that give students practical experience with several different programming language paradigms. Topics include: syntax and semantics of programming languages; data types and structures; control flow including blocks, subroutines, and recursion; implementation methods for semantic features; and comparison of several programming languages. (4 credits) Prerequisite: CS 321
Students learn the systems programs that link the outer activity of high-level programming languages with the internal activity of the computer hardware. Knowledge of this deeper level of systems programs gives a greater range of possibilities to the programmer. Students learn system software such as compilers, linkers, loaders, and debuggers, and the structure and functions of an operating system including device management, process management, system calls, and memory management. (4 credits) Prerequisites: CS 221 and CS 272 / MATH 272
Formal abstract models of computation study the fundamental limitations and capabilities of computers. This course presents a hierarchy of increasingly sophisticated abstract machines in relation to their increasing ability to recognize more general classes of formal languages. Topics include: formal grammar, finite-state machines, equivalence of finite-state machines, right-linear and left-linear grammar, context-free languages, Turing machines, unsolvable problems, and recursive functions. (4 credits) Prerequisite: CS 350 or CS 401 or consent of the Department faculty
In this course, students participate in a comprehensive system development project to apply and integrate the concepts of software design and implementation. Topics include: methods and tools for large system development including analysis, design, testing, and documentation. Students work in teams to develop a substantial analysis and design project. (4 credits) Prerequisites: CS 221 and at least one CS 400 level elective
In this course students create an original software project from the ground up from the initial analysis and design phases through implementation and testing. Students are expected to submit several project proposals before the start of the course, and submit a written project postmortem at the end of the course. With Faculty approval this course can be extended to two months to facilitate a larger project (4 or 8 credits) Prerequisite: CS 335, or consent of the department faculty
Discrete mathematics, the study of finite processes and discrete phenomena, is essential for computer science. Topics include logic and sets, relations and functions, vertex-edge graphs, recursion, and combinatorics. (4 credits) Prerequisite: MATH 162, WTG 192
Calculus, one of the most useful areas of mathematics, is the study of continuous change. It provides the language and concepts used by modern science to quantify the laws of nature and the numerical techniques through which this knowledge is applied to enrich daily life. Using the mathematics computer laboratory, students gain a clear understanding of the fundamental principles of calculus and how they are applied in real-world situations. Topics: limits, continuity, derivatives, applications of derivatives, integrals, and the fundamental theorem of calculus. (4 credits) Prerequisite: MATH 162
Calculus, one of the most useful areas of mathematics, is the study of continuous change. It provides the language and concepts used by modern science to quantify the laws of nature and the numerical techniques through which this knowledge is applied to enrich daily life. Using the mathematics computer laboratory, students gain a clear understanding of the fundamental principles of calculus and how they are applied in real-world situations. Topics: techniques of integration, further applications of derivatives, and applications of integration. (4 credits) Prerequisite: MATH 281
Linear algebra studies linearity, the simplest form of quantitative relationship, and provides a basis for the study of many areas of pure and applied mathematics, as well as key applications in the physical, biological, and social sciences. Topics include systems of linear equations, vectors, vector equations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces, bases, and linear transformations. (4 credits) Prerequisite: MATH 282

4 credits of course work in management

8 credits of computer science courses 300 or 400 or above

Request Info

I am a US citizen or Green Card holder *

* required fields

Send Request