Visit Us Apply Request Info Navigation Close
Maharishi Universityof Management

Degree Requirements

To graduate with a BA in Business Administration, students must successfully complete all general requirements for the bachelor’s degree. In addition, 52 credits of coursework in business administration must be completed in the following modules:

Required: 34 credits in the Core Curriculum

The course has a practical focus on career discovery and implementation. In the framework of Consciousness-Based principles for success, students consider their own skills, abilities, and objectives, and learn to design a career that utilizes their talents and creativity for maximum effectiveness, achievement, and evolution. They design an action plan to implement their career goals, and then work with the best Internet resources to research occupational interests, business and service organization profiles, and industry trends. Students learn networking strategies, including interviews, and using the telephone and Internet for extending their professional networks. They also develop scripts for introducing themselves and describing their achievements and capabilities with confidence in various formats, writing about themselves in the cover letter, resume, and portfolio, and speaking about themselves and what they can offer to potential colleagues, funding agencies and employers.
Effective communicators are skilled at both informing and inspiring other people. This course provides instruction and practice in making oral and written presentations based on the principle that ideal communication is a frictionless flow that nourishes both sender and receiver. Topics include: word processing and presentation software; library and Internet research skills; oral presentations; writing letters, reports, proposals, and manuals; and the principles of ideal communication. Prerequisite: WTG 192
In this Critical and Creative Thinking seminar, students develop their skill in the use of logical argument, the interpretation of evidence, and the analysis of underlying assumptions to understand current issues in economics. We review the basic assumptions and logic of classical microeconomics and macroeconomics in light of their modern critique through sustainability. Specific topics will vary from one offering to the next. However, frequent themes in the course are the social responsibility of business, the importance of local versus global markets, equality of economic opportunity, the distribution of wealth and income, the role of government in the economy, the conservation of natural resources, and the goals of an economic system. Prerequisites: STC 108, taken during students’ first semester or with consent of the Department faculty
This course provides analytic tools and techniques to assist management in planning, decision-making, and control. Topics include: cost-volume-profit analysis, manufacturing costs, job order and process costing, standard costing and variance analysis, variable and full costing, fixed and flexible budgets, responsibility accounting, direct and absorption costing, and the behavioral implications of management accounting systems.
Statistics offers powerful quantitative tools based on the underlying orderliness of nature to support improved decision-making in business and environmental management. Statistics is the art and science of finding meaningful patterns and relationships in data (data analysis), generating useful data (data production), and drawing valid conclusions from data (statistical inference). In this course, students will learn how to use key graphical and numerical tools of data analysis, how to effectively present their findings, and evaluate the validity of their conclusions. Environmental applications and case studies will be emphasized. Topics include: graphical and numerical tools for summarizing and describing data, modeling data with probability distributions, sampling and surveys, designing experiments, hypothesis testing for means and proportions, correlation analysis, and modeling relationships using regression analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 153 or equivalent
Financial management provides an intelligent direction to the flow of funds for maximizing firm value. This course introduces techniques and concepts necessary to effectively manage the financial resources of any organization in order to achieve strategic goals. Topics include: the time value of money, stock and bond valuation, risk and return, capital investment decisions, analysis of financial statements, financial forecasting, working capital management, the investment banking process, and the sources of funding for a business. Students will develop capital requirements, plan the raising of capital, and develop a cash flow design for their business plan project. Prerequisite: MGT 316
Marketing is the process of creating exchanges that satisfy individual and organizational objectives. Topics include: consumer behavior, market research, market segmentation,
competitive positioning and strategy, advertising, pricing, distribution and channel management, selling techniques and sales force management, and new product development. Students conduct an industry analysis and write the marketing section for their business plan. Prerequisites: WTG 192
Law is a tool of progress. It creates the legal form of the business and enables business people to communicate clearly. It facilitates their commercial relationships and averts problems before they arise. Familiarity with business law and the natural laws upon which it is based promotes success for the individual and society. Topics include: contracts, torts, agency, bankruptcy, secured transactions and property (real, personal, and intellectual property.) Students learn to select the most appropriate form of organization for their business and draft simple contracts.
People are an organization’s most important asset. Success comes from organizing and managing people to produce the products and services that customers value. This survey course exposes students to the full array of human resource functions: human resource planning, recruitment and selection, training, performance management, compensation, unions, and upholding employer/employee rights and responsibilities. The students become familiar with the role of human resource department staff in designing human resource systems, as well as the critical role line managers and supervisors play in using these systems effectively to attract, retain, and motivate employees. Students also design a comprehensive human resource section for their business plan.

Required: 16 credits in one of the following tracks

Business Track: 16 Credits

Choose 12 credits from the following courses:

This course provides a holistic overview of business for new management majors or students from other majors. Principles of marketing, finance, operations, accounting, and human resources are taught in the perspective of an integrated business strategy and are illustrated by lively examples from videos, case studies, guest speakers, and field trips.
This workshop-style course will give students hands-on training in the steps needed to start a nonprofit organization that include establishing a board of directors, creating a mission statement, planning strategically, and following legal protocols. Students will gain a thorough grasp of fundraising by connecting with a local nonprofit organization, researching grant opportunities for it on the Foundation Center national database, and drafting an actual grant proposal. In addition, students will examine what it takes for an organization to thrive over time.
This project-based class challenges students to employ every ounce of their creativity and
apply their knowledge to finding solutions to the world’s most challenging problems, whether local or global, in the area of environmental sustainability, education, communications, or business. Each week we will connect with and learn from social entrepreneurs from around the world working in education, mobile technology, community development and so forth, and draw inspiration from their relentless vision and determination. Through the study of innovations in the social sector, we will develop an understanding of core principles and tactics of social change as well as the necessary leadership qualities of social entrepreneurs. Students will work individually or in groups to conceive of a social intervention of their own design. Students will present their plans, models and media to a committee to evaluate the potential of their work to create social
change.
This course provides in-depth study of management information systems.
An understanding of the principles of human behavior at the individual, interpersonal, group, and organizational levels of analysis is critical to successful planning, organizing, and implementation by any manager. This course explores the dynamics of individual and group achievement from the perspectives of both skills and theory. Topics include: general management theory, leadership, delegation and coordination, planning and problem solving, organizational structure, and organizational change.
Ever increasing globalization makes it imperative that students understand the different cultures in their world. This course provides frameworks useful in classifying cultures and understanding cultural norms and traditions. Analyzing case studies and participating in workshops and presentations enable students to establish patterns of behavior that facilitate cross-cultural communication.
This course is a survey of negotiation, mediation, and arbitration methods of resolving disputes without litigation. Students gain practical negotiation skills through workshops and case studies. Topics include: understanding other parties, building a productive framework for negotiation, defining objectives and strategy, framing proposals, and finding “win/win” solutions.
This course presents the core aspects of marketing online, including usability oriented site architectures, pay per click campaigns, search engine optimization, social media and content strategies. Students develop a working website to demonstrate mastery of these concepts.
The process of investing guides the allocation of society’s resources. Socially responsible
investing guides resources toward firms that have life-supporting products and operational practices and that will be sustainable in the long run. This introductory course reviews the basics of investment analysis, examines the philosophy that money is colored by how it is earned, and reviews the methods for identifying socially responsible companies.
This course offers practical experience through work in business administration, public
administration, or educational administration. Students maintain journals that record their
growth in understanding and experience, as well as their impact on the organization.

Plus one of the following capstone courses:

 

Ideal for both Management and Sustainable Living students, this course shows how creating an environmentally sustainable operation can provide opportunities for increasing profits. Using case studies, students learn how to apply the core principles of sustainability in agriculture, business, manufacturing, government and other activities, so that it is both profitable and beneficial to the environment. The course is project-based and covers sustainability in all areas of society from both local and global perspectives. The role of ISO 14001, responsible investing, and environmental advocacy organizations, in the transition to sustainable living, will be made clear. Students will interact with city and industry leaders and managers to create budget and return-on-investment projections for transformation to sustainable practices.
This capstone course enables entrepreneurs or intrapreneurs to dynamically integrate the knowledge of the Entrepreneurship Module in the creation of their business plan to manifest their intention. Students evaluate sample business plans, review and give feedback on classmates’ business plans, and revise and present their own business plan to faculty and mentors.

Accounting Track: 16 credits

Choose 12 credits of the following required courses:

This capstone course enables entrepreneurs or intrapreneurs to dynamically integrate the knowledge of the Entrepreneurship Module in the creation of their business plan to manifest their intention. Students evaluate sample business plans, review and give feedback on classmates’ business plans, and revise and present their own business plan to faculty and mentors.
This course sequence provides a technical analysis of how generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) are applied in the presentation of published financial statements. The interplay of government, the accounting profession, and the conceptual framework of accounting at the basis of formulating GAAP demonstrate how collective consciousness interacts within itself to create steps of social evolution. References are made to technical statements and pronouncements that are the sources of GAAP, covering a variety of specific topics such as accounting for leases, pensions, and inter-period income tax.
This course sequence provides a technical analysis of how generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) are applied in the presentation of published financial statements. The interplay of government, the accounting profession, and the conceptual framework of accounting at the basis of formulating GAAP demonstrate how collective consciousness interacts within itself to create steps of social evolution. References are made to technical statements and pronouncements that are the sources of GAAP, covering a variety of specific topics such as accounting for leases, pensions, and inter-period income tax.

Plus 4 credits from the following elective courses:

 

This course provides in-depth study of management information systems.
This course offers understanding from practical experience through work in accounting. In a capstone project, students integrate the knowledge of accounting they have gained in their BA program by seeing how it is put into practice.
In this course, students are guided to prepare for one part of the Certified Professional Accountant or Certified Management Accountant exam.

Business Electives

earn at least 2 credits from among the following:

Any course with an MGT designation not used to meet a Core or Track requirement

Delving into Maharishi’s knowledge of leadership, students hear leaders interpret their leadership experiences, and leadership consultants speak on the success of consciousness-based leadership. Students examine their own experiences of leadership and discover the principles of consciousness at work in those experiences. They also consider how to apply this knowledge of leadership in their future career.
Ever increasing globalization makes it imperative that students understand the different cultures in their world. This course provides frameworks useful in classifying cultures and understanding cultural norms and traditions. Analyzing case studies and participating in workshops and presentations enable students to establish patterns of behavior that facilitate cross-cultural communication. Not for business credit if MGT 405 has been taken.
Whether we work for ourselves or lead a small team or an entire organization, we are the first beneficiaries of everything we think, do, and say. It’s not what happens to us; it’s what happens in us. Since we spend about 60–70% of our lives on the job, this course gives us an opportunity to examine how our approach to our work can be adjusted during these stressful times.
This course develops an awareness of and appreciation for the values, life styles, history, and contributions of various identifiable subgroups in our society. Activities and discussions will help students recognize and deal with dehumanizing biases such as sexism, racism, prejudice, and discrimination and become aware of the impact that such biases have on interpersonal relations.
This course focuses on providing students with tools and techniques to be effective leaders and exceptional group participants. The course has an emphasis on improving communication skills and developing greater self-awareness. Students learn about individual tendencies, team dynamics, mediation and facilitation. They also learn how to recognize subtle body language in communication and how to recognize and address the needs and concerns of diverse individuals they are working with. Together students explore what it means to be a leader in our communities and specifically in the Maharishi University of Management community. The class is interactive and provides students with time to experience the lessons through various planned activities. All students interested in being part of the Peer Mentorship must take this course.
The goal of this course is to familiarize students with soft skills — intrapersonal and interpersonal — that determine a person’s ability to excel or at least fit in a particular social structure, such as a project team or a company. These skills include competencies in areas such as communication, personal habits, time-management, personal relations, etiquette, self-motivation, self-discipline, persuasion, etc. Students will understand cultural orientation of the U.S. i.e., how people in the U.S. speak, act, negotiate and make decisions. They will also learn how these skills arise from their common source in the eternal laws of nature as explained by the Science of Creative Intelligence.
Success in life is based on profound knowledge that guides action to produce the desired achievement to bring fulfillment. This course explores key themes of knowledge that highlight the contributions of Maharishi Vedic Science and Technology to individual and professional success and fulfillment in life.
We live our lives in relationships, beginning with our mother, father, and family, expanding to our friends, spouse, and children, our business associates, our fellow citizens, and on to all the people of the world. Handling these relationships with wisdom, appropriateness, and love is central to our good fortune. The Science of Creative intelligence and Maharishi Vedic Science provide insights into how all relationships have their source in the self-referral dynamics of consciousness, our own Self —and guidelines for ensuring that our relationships are in accord with the natural evolution of life in accord with natural law. The course features tapes of Maharishi, guest presentations, group projects, and practical knowledge of etiquette.
In this course students study the Rāmāyaṇa, one of the great epics of the Vedic Literature.
Students read the Rāmāyana in Sanskrit and English, and see videos of the Rāmāyaṇa. Students see videotapes by Maharishi on topics related to the Rāmāyaṇa and create presentations on the Rāmāyaṇa.Students may interview for business positions and earn up to 16 elective credits of internship toward their bachelor’s degree with the approval of the BA program director or department chair. Students at Maharishi University of Management have a particular advantage in the competition for internships nationwide.The block calendar of month-to month study makes it easy for a student to take off one or more months and work full-time on a business project at any time of the year. Such internships are an opportunity for students to apply the knowledge gained in the Business Administration major in a workplace setting.

Graduation Requirements for the Minor in Business Administration

*
To graduate with a minor in Business Administration, students must complete 20 credits of coursework in business, including MGT 200: Growing a Business.

Graduation Requirements for the Minor in Government

To graduate with a minor in government, students must complete 20 credits of coursework in government (GOV) or the following MGT courses:

State and federal taxation are instruments of social policy. The principles of taxation must be considered in the planning and decision-making process of every organization whether profit or nonprofit. This course surveys basic tax concepts and their use in individual and organizational tax planning. Topics include: social policy implications of taxation,concepts of income, tax reporting, taxpaying entities, deductions, property transactions, and gain or loss recognition.
Law is a tool of progress. It creates the legal form of the business and enables business people to communicate clearly. It facilitates their commercial relationships and averts problems before they arise. Familiarity with business law and the natural laws upon which it is based promotes success for the individual and society. Topics include: contracts, torts, agency, bankruptcy, secured transactions and property (real, personal, and intellectual property.) Students learn to select the most appropriate form of organization for their business and draft simple contracts.
People are an organization’s most important asset. Success comes from organizing and managing people to produce the products and services that customers value. This survey course exposes students to the full array of human resource functions: human resource planning, recruitment and selection, training, performance management, compensation, unions, and upholding employer/employee rights and responsibilities. The students become familiar with the role of human resource department staff in designing human resource systems, as well as the critical role line managers and supervisors play in using these systems effectively to attract, retain, and motivate employees. Students also design a comprehensive human resource section for their business plan.
This course is a survey of negotiation, mediation, and arbitration methods of resolving disputes without litigation. Students gain practical negotiation skills through workshops and case studies. Topics include: understanding other parties, building a productive framework for negotiation, defining objectives and strategy, framing proposals, and finding “win/win” solutions.
From local regulations about water quality to global initiatives like the Kyoto Accord, the law is an important tool for regulating our use of the environment. During this course, students will become familiar with international treaties and protocols on global warming, pollution, and endangered species. The class will also study the key features of American environmental law including the Clean Air and Water Act, the Environmental Protection Act, and other current policies and regulations. Perhaps most importantly, students will understand the lawmaking process as a way to use the legal system to bring about positive change and build sustainable communities.

Graduation Requirements for the Minor in World Peace

To graduate with a minor in world peace, students must complete:

From the perspective of the Science of Creative Intelligence and Maharishi Vedic Science, students explore the principles and dynamics of collective consciousness and their relationship to governmental functioning, societal trends, and the quality of life in society. Students examine published evidence verifying the beneficial changes in society produced by the group practice of the Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi programs, with particular reference to the implications of these technologies of consciousness for enhancing governmental achievements and promoting world peace. (Offered jointly with the Department of Maharishi Vedic Science)
This course explores how the individual can used as a unit of world peace (Offered jointly with the Department of Maharishi Vedic Science).

 

Plus 12 credits of coursework from the following:

LIT 207: The Bhagavad-Gita
LIT 366: The Peace Film
LIT 370: Literature and the Environment
MGT 402: Managing for Sustainability
MGT 403: World Peace Project
MGT 405: Cross-Cultural Communication
MGT 484: Mediation and Negotiation
MVS 302: Bhagavad-Gita — Chapters 1–3
MVS 303: Bhagavad-Gita — Chapters 4–6
MVS 304: Application of Maharishi Vedic Science
MVS 307: Practicum in Maharishi Vedic Science
MVS 330: Transcendental Meditation-Sidhi® Course
SL—P101: Sustainable Global Environment

Graduation Requirements for a Certificate in Business Studies

To receive a Certificate in Business Studies, students must complete 18 credits as follows:

STC 108 (6 credits)
Any three, 4-credit undergraduate MGT courses (12 credits)

Request Info

I am a US citizen or Green Card holder *

* required fields

Send Request