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THE BA PROGRAM IN ART

Art majors are guided in small classes by practicing artists who are experienced teachers. They learn to express their creativity in diverse media including painting, drawing, ceramics, photography, installation, sculpture, screen printing, and digital media. Art students also gain the inspiration of great works of art from many eras and cultures in art history classes, and learn to appreciate art as an expression of consciousness, their own Self. The BA program cultivates creativity, perception, and problem-solving, abilities which are valuable throughout life. For students who aspire to a career in the arts, we recommend the BFA program.

BA Program Assessment

Every year a Visiting Evaluator assesses our students’ performance on the objectives listed below. The Evaluator, an experienced art professor at another university or art school, compares MUM students with the students he or she has taught. MUM art students often rate in the top 20% of all students the Evaluator has worked with, and some students rate in the top 10%. Here are some comments from Evaluators:

  • “Your students are awake, enlivened and engaged.”
  • “The student work, both academic and creative, reflected a general sense of student well being…”
  • “The strengths are knowledgeable, experienced teachers with an eye to the big picture…”
  • “Your strengths are a dedicated and hardworking faculty, the rich committed environment and attitudes of your students, and the spiritual grounding you have given your students.”

These outcomes are cultivated throughout the art curriculum and are strongly developed in the courses listed under each section.

Learning Outcomes For The BA Program

1. Appreciate the development of consciousness

 Students understand the value of regularly drawing upon the universal source of creativity, pure consciousness, through the Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi programs to culture the “art of living,” a high quality of life characterized by happiness, alertness, and effortless creativity.

Understanding Art, Drawing 2, Painting 3, Ceramics 3, Sculpture 3

2. Appreciate art in the light of consciousness

Students begin to experience and understand, as part of their own self, the natural laws that structure the creative process, the art work, and the development of consciousness of the artist, audience, and culture.

Understanding Art, Principles of Design, Drawing 2, Painting 3, Ceramics 3, Sculpture 2, Sculpture 3,Traditions of World Art,Prehistoric to Medieval Art, Renaissance to Contemporary Art, 19th and 20th Century Art,Contemporary Art and Criticism, Artist as Philosopher–Critical Theory

3. Gain an inspiring knowledge of art history

Students understand art from many time periods as expressions of aesthetic values, of the cultural and historical context of art making, and of universal values of consciousness.

Art and Nature, Drawing 2, Painting 3, Ceramics 3, Sculpture 1,Sculpture 2,Sculpture 3, Understanding Art,Traditions of World Art,Prehistoric to Medieval Art, Renaissance to Contemporary Art, 19th and 20th Century Art, Contemporary Art and Criticism, Artist as Philosopher–Critical Theory

4. Cultivate writing skills

Students can write clearly and meaningfully about art.

Drawing 2, Painting 3, Ceramics 3, Sculpture 3,Understanding Art,Traditions of World Art,Prehistoric to Medieval Art, Renaissance to Contemporary Art, 19th and 20th Century Art,Contemporary Art and Criticism,Artist as Philosopher–Critical Theory

5. Polish presentation skills

Students can speak effectively about art.

Drawing 2, Painting 3, Ceramics 3,Understanding Art,Traditions of World Art,Prehistoric to Medieval Art, Renaissance to Contemporary Art, 19th and 20th Century Art,Contemporary Art and Criticism,Artist as Philosopher–Critical Theory

6. Develop research skills

Students know how to locate, evaluate, and properly use valuable, relevant and credible sources.

Art and Nature, Drawing 2, Painting 3, Ceramics 3, Sculpture 2, Sculpture 3, Traditions of World Art,Prehistoric to Medieval Art, Renaissance to Contemporary Art, 19th and 20th Century Art,Contemporary Art and Criticism,Artist as Philosopher–Critical Theory

7. Cultivate studio practice

Students gain competence in manual skills, a thorough grounding in technical knowledge, and an understanding of materials and processes in specific areas of art.

Principles of Design, Drawing 2, Painting 3, Photography 1, Photography 2, Ceramics 3, Sculpture 1, Sculpture 2, Sculpture 3

8. Encourage the expression of uplifting values

Students express values nourishing to the artist, the viewer and the culture, applying art to enrich the environment.

Art and Nature, Principles of Design, Painting 3, Ceramics 3, Sculpture 1, Sculpture 2, Environmental Sculpture

Graduation Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Art

48 credits (12 art courses) including:

8 credits of these courses to be taken in the first or second year:

FA 205 Principles of Design

Principles of Design: The Quest for Balance and Unity in Art and Life

This course provides the knowledge and practical experience of how visual elements are organized by principles universal to the fine and applied arts. Topics include  examining and applying design principles and vocabulary such as figure/ground, interdependence, symmetry, rhythm, shape, and texture; understanding how these principles and their components apply to the scope of the visual arts, including drawing, sculpture, ceramics, photography, graphic design, architecture, fabric design, and landscaping; and understanding and expressing how design principles can be correlated to the balance and order of the universe and to individual life and living.

(4 credits)

Prerequisite: STC 108/109

FA 301 Drawing 1

Drawing 1, Drawing from Within: Engaging the Principles of Observation through the Action of Drawing

In this course, students develop powers of observation and imagination, abilities that are vital for all the arts. Students focus on establishing the use of principles of drawing through observational methods. Topics include still life, figure drawing, interior and landscape. Art and design majors take drawing courses as they advance through the curriculum. Can be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor. Materials fee: $35. (1-4 credits) Prerequisite: STC 108/109

FA 311 Painting 1

Growth of the Artist through Refinement of Perception and Enhancement of the Ability to Discriminate and Integrate

Painting expresses the artist’s connection with the deep laws fundamental to seeing and creating visual images. Students are immersed in the fundamentals of drawing and painting from nature and a variety of other subject matter. The curriculum addresses the students’ development of formal and technical skills along with a conceptual and critical understanding of the language of painting as preparation for independent studio work. May be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor.

(1–4 credits)

Prerequisite: a previous art course and consent of the instructor

4 credits of one of these courses:

FA 203 Understanding Art

Culturing Aesthetic Sensibility by Appreciating the Arts as Expressions of the Heart, Mind, and Universal Self

Art and media are crystallizations of consciousness. This course cultures a deep appreciation for the arts through intellectual knowledge and direct experience. Slide lectures, discussions, readings, and workshops reveal that art is structured in the multilayered consciousness of the artist and the audience, and in the collective consciousness of the culture. The greatest art works give glimpses of the goal of all creativity — the universal Self in higher states of consciousness — and thus continue to inspire people throughout time. Topics include: the fundamentals of art — creativity, form, function, and symbolism; the great achievements of sacred art; archetypes of consciousness in the arts; and traditional and contemporary approaches to evaluating and interpreting art. Course includes field trips to art museums and an artist’s gallery.

Fieldtrip fee: $50.

(4 credits)

FA 470 Contemporary Art and Criticism Seminar

Deepening Artistic Experience and Intellectual Understanding for Creative Growth

Students examine the vocation, role, and responsibility of the contemporary artist and art critic in the light of their own artistic aspirations. This seminar focuses primarily on contemporary art and art criticism to develop the integration of intellectual understanding and studio practice. The concentrated experience of reading and writing about art cultures the habit of going more deeply into the substance of works of art, which nurtures the ability to more clearly apply and realize the highest values of visual expression. A highlight of the course is a field trip to a major art center, such as Chicago.

Field trip fee: $250–300 or more.

(4 credits)

Prerequisite: BFA student or consent of the instructor

Plus 8 credits from the following art history courses:

FA 381 Prehistoric to Medieval Art

Prehistoric to Medieval Art: Discovering the Eternal Quest for Immortality in Western Sculpture, Painting, and Architecture.

Students explore the great achievements of art and architecture in prehistoric cultures and in the ancient civilizations of Egypt, Greece, Rome, Byzantium, and the European Middle Ages. In each of these cultures, the quest for immortality created art that continues to inspire human consciousness. Students examine how contemporary artists have been influenced by art from these periods. Topics include sacred sites that connected humanity with the cosmos, the Mother Goddess in art and culture, the development of styles in Egyptian and Greek art and how they mirror stages in the unfoldment of consciousness, and the creation of a heavenly kingdom on Earth in Christian art and architecture. A highlight of the course is a 4-day field trip to a major art center such as New York, St. Louis or Kansas City. Field trip fee: $175-$225 (or more). (4 credits) Prerequisite: STC 108/109

FA 382 Renaissance to Contemporary Art

Renaissance to Contemporary Art: The Search for Fulfillment in Art and Life from the Renaissance to Modernism, Post-Modernism, and an Emerging Art of Expanded Awareness

Students focus on the most inspiring creations of Western art and architecture from the 1400s to the twenty-first century. They discover how artists have expressed both sacred and secular values in their quest for perfection in art and fulfillment in life. This epoch’s vast amount of art is comprehended in terms of cultural paradigms – a paradigm is both an era’s ideal of art and a world-view. The four major paradigms covered are: Renaissance, Modernism, Post-Modernism, and an emerging contemporary paradigm – an art of expanded awareness. Topics include the transformation of art and consciousness in each paradigm; the integration of spirit and matter in Renaissance art; how the art of the past has influenced modern artists; and the artists, styles, symbols cultural values, and aspects of consciousness expressed in the major paradigms. A highlight of the course is a 4-day field trip to a major art center such as Chicago. Field trip fee: $175-$225. (4 credits) Prerequisite: STC 108/109

FA 384 Traditions of World Art

Traditions of World Art: Exploring Ancient Art that Transcends Time and Place by Embodying the Wholeness of Life

Students journey through the glorious traditions of world art, including Indian, Chinese, Japanese, Islamic, African, and Native American art. All traditions reflect both unique cultural values and universal values, such as the aspiration to embody the wholeness of life in higher states of consciousness. Students also explore how the arts of these cultures continue to inspire modern artists. Topics include the world views of traditional cultures compared to the world view of the modern West; the nature and functions of sacred art; the embodiment of forces of nature in Indian art, Taoist and Buddhist painting and sculpture, Islamic design and architecture, African masks and ritual objects, and Native American art and artifacts. A highlight of the course is a 3-4 day field trip to a major art center such as Chicago, St. Louis or Kansas City. Field trip fee: $175-$225. (4 credits) Prerequisite: STC 108/109

FA 385 Modern Art, 1880-1945

The Search for Transcending in Art, Culture, and Consciousness

This class is about fascinating stories, key works, and iconic figures of modern art, from its origins in Post-Impressionism to the beginnings of the New York School. Moving chronologically students will explore an array of renowned and provocative objects— from paintings that challenged the official Academy and revolutionized the conventions of representation to works that are completely abstract—by such artists as Paul Cézanne, Vincent van Gogh, Constantin Brancusi, Marcel Duchamp, Henri Matisse, and Pablo Picasso, among others. Each style is related to the consciousness of the artist and theaudience, and the collective consciousness of the culture. Course fee: $160.

Field trip fee:$25.

(4 credits)

Prerequisite: BFA student or consent of the instructor

FA 386 Modern and Contemporary Art, 1945-1989

Exploring Possibilities for Art and Consciousness in Modern Culture

This course is a guided experience examining major artists, artworks, and movements in Western art after World War II. Students explore the emergence of the New York School and its links to a new global economy centered in New York, Dada’s revival, Pop art’s flowering in mass consumer society, and Minimalism’s formal refinement and emphasis on spatial context. The course then considers Conceptual art’s fundamental questioning of art, the development of multimedia artistic practices and performance art, and the influence of identity politics on art. Each phase of art is connected to the consciousness of the artist and the audience, and the collective consciousness of the culture.

Course fee: $160. Field trip fee: $25.

(4 credits)

Prerequisite: BFA student or consent of the
instructor

Plus 4 credits of either:

FA 341 Ceramics 1

Ceramics 1, Shaping the Unmanifest: Clay Forming, Glazing and Firing through Handbuilding Methods

Students learn the entire process of ceramics from making clay to firing pottery, providing them with the basic skills necessary to express consciousness in matter in this medium. Topics include addressing the vessel with handbuilding methods such as pinch, coil and slab construction; basic glazing methods; earthenware, stoneware, and raku firing methods. Lab fee: $45. (4 credits) Prerequisite: STC 108/109

FA 351 Sculpture 1

Sculpture 1, Bas Relief: Breathing Life into Matter

By exploring organic forms and creating designs from imagination, students make original sculptural surfaces that emerge from a two-dimensional plane. Exercises that expand the capacity to envision and create give students a deeper appreciation of the nature, creation, and function of sculpture, and thus the opportunity to express the fundamental laws that structure form in the natural world. Topics include low, middle and high relief; organizing principles of two and three-dimensional design (balance, rhythm, economy, etc.); light and shadow; transforming clay reliefs into plaster reliefs; the history of relief sculpture. Materials: paper/cardboard, clay and plaster. Materials fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisite: STC 108/109

plus 4 credits taken in the final year of:

FA 475 BA Portfolio and Final Project

This course, taken in the final semester, is the culmination of the BA degree in art. BA candidates collect and edit a digital portfolio of their best work from all the art courses taken, augmenting it with work done during this block. Students also create a written project, typically an essay, reflecting on their experience of art and the creative process in the Art Department. The portfolio and written project form the basis of a 7-minute presentation sharing the student’s growth of creativity and consciousness while at MUM.

Plus 20 credits (5 courses) of electives in art from the following:

FA 141 Art and the Self

Art and the Self: Awakening the Transcendental Basis of Artistic Genius by Expressing the Full Range of Life in a Self-Portrait

Students delve into the creative process with focus on the self-portrait. To learn about the history of the self-portrait, they view some of the most famous self-portraits in Western art by Rembrandt, van Gogh, Anguissola, Vigee-Lebrun, Kollwitz, Escher, and others. Then they create their own. Through lectures and readings on art by Maharishi, students come to appreciate art from the deepest perspective – that all art originates within the Self of the artist, and they verify this from their own experience as artists. Topics include principles of design and drawing. Students learn to use and combine the simple elements of line, shape, tone, and change of direction to foster self-expression. (4 credits) Prerequisite: STC 108/109

FA 201 Art and Nature

Expressing Art from the Source of Natural Law through Interdisciplinary Exploration of the Beauty and Wonder of Nature

Students gain an appreciation for the mechanics of creation as experienced in the natural world and within the realm of one’s own awareness as they engage in creative expression and the making of art. Through the experience of an ongoing interdisciplinary project, inspired by their observation of nature, students prepare a unique aesthetic presentation. Topics include: drawing from nature, photographing nature, design and camouflage, math in nature, music in nature, the language of nature — Sanskrit, perceptual exercises, birdwatching, and earth and environmental artists, including Goldsworthy, Long, and the Harrisons.

Materials fee: $35.

(4 credits)

FA 204 CCTS

The Spiritual Quest in Media, Myth, and the Self — The Hero and Heroine’s Journey as the Development of Consciousness

Students explore their own spiritual quest in the light of the wisdom shared in great mythic stories, focusing on epics, mythology, and modern films. Drawing upon the insights of scholars of myth like Joseph Campbell, students identify the universal stages of the quest archetype: the hero’s journey as he or she evolves to higher states of awareness. Students consider theories of consciousness and analyze how they can illuminate mythic stories and their own life. In the culminating course project, students create their own mythic stories that reflect their personal vision and the transformation of consciousness. Topics include: the power of myth, archetypal characters and events, the inspiration of ancient myths, adapting ancient stories to modern situations, plot structure and character development.

Textbook fee: $20

(4 credits)

Prerequisites: STC 108, taken during students’ first semester, or consent of the Department faculty

FA 231 Great Civilizations

Fulfilling the Ancient Quest for Heaven on Earth as Sought by Vedic, Chinese, Indian, Middle Eastern, African, Native American and Western Cultures

Students explore the most inspiring creations of civilization highlighting humanity’s quest for an ideal society. The course begins with the venerable Vedic civilization, continues with extraordinary videotapes, slide lectures, and interviews on many other cultures, and concludes by examining the possibilities for creating an ideal society today. By familiarizing students with many cultures in the light of their own consciousness, this course nurtures global citizens of the twenty-first century, at home in the world family. Topics include: Western and Vedic views of history, research on lost or forgotten ancient civilizations, and cultural history from prehistoric times to the present day. Students have the opportunity to do research on a topic of their choice.

No textbook fees.

(4 credits)

FA 302 Drawing 2: Drawing from Within

Exploring New Materials and Possibilities for Self-Expression 

Students learn to use the power of drawing to convey a story, thus revealing in a visual narrative the sequential unfoldment of consciousness. Students engage the fundamental principles of drawing while introducing a variety of methods and materials; this sustains aesthetic unity while encouraging diversity in the discovery process and the resulting image. Taught in an open studio situation, the course allows the teacher to address both the general needs of the group and the specific needs of the individual student to advance in the experience of drawing as a means of self-expression.

Materials fee: $35.

(1–4 credits)

Prerequisite: FA 301

FA 304 Drawing Studio

Exploring Alternate Viewpoints

Students explore drawing with an emphasis on process, and its result, as a response to nature and the environment. Different applied viewpoints may include illustration, graphics, animation, architecture, site-specific sculpture, industrial design, painting, and sculpture. The theme of the course depends on the instructor. Materials fee: approximately $75, which includes field trips. (1-4 credits) Prerequisites: one of these courses: FA 301, FA 201, FA 351, FA 532 or FA 205

FA 308 Screenprinting

FA 308 Screenprinting: Exploring the Multiple Image
Students explore images through silkscreen printing. The emphasis is on learning the process and developing possibilities with a multiple image derived from drawn, painted, collaged, printed and photographed images. Different applied viewpoints may include illustration, graphic design, painting, sculpture, and ceramics. Materials fee: approximately $50. (4 credits) Prerequisites: one of these courses: FA 205, 301, 304, 311, 331, or 361.

FA 311 Painting 1

Painting 1: Growth of the Artist through Refinement of Perception and Enhancement of the Ability to Discriminate and Integrate

Painting expresses the artist’s connection with the deep laws fundamental to seeing and creating visual images. Students are immersed in the fundamentals of drawing and painting from nature and a variety of other subject matter. The curriculum addresses the students’ development of formal and technical skills along with a conceptual and critical understanding of the language of painting as preparation for independent studio work. Can be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor. (1–4 credits)

FA 312 Painting 2

Painting 2: Growth of the Artist through Refinement of Perception and the Expansion of Flexibility, Subtlety, Expression, Spontaneity, and Evenness by Means of the Brush

Painting expresses the artist’s connection with the deep laws fundamental to seeing and creating visual images. Students are immersed in the fundamentals of drawing and painting from nature and a variety of other subject matter. The curriculum addresses the students’ development of formal and technical skills along with a conceptual and critical understanding of the language of painting as preparation for independent studio work. Can be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor. (1-4 credits) Prerequisite: FA 311

FA 315 Painting 1 & 3

Growth of the Artist through Refinement of Perception and the Expansion of the Methods and Materials of Painting

Students at different skill levels are in the same course but are given different assignments and projects to appropriately develop their formal and technical skills, guided by the faculty member. Students also gain a conceptual and critical understanding of the language of painting as preparation for independent studio work.

FA 316 Painting 3

Painting 3: Growth of the Artist through Refinement of Perception and the Expansion of the Methods and Materials of Painting

Painting expresses the artist’s connection with the deep laws fundamental to seeing and creating visual images. Students are immersed in the fundamentals of drawing and painting from nature and a variety of other subject matter. The curriculum addresses the students’ development of formal and technical skills along with a conceptual and critical understanding of the language of painting as preparation for independent studio work. Can be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor. (1-4 credits) Prerequisite: FA 311, 312 or consent of instructor

FA 331 Photography 1

Photography 1, Capturing Moments of Light: Learning the Essentials of the Darkroom and Appreciating Photography as a Tool for Refined Artistic Expression

Students learn to use the photographic medium as a tool for exploring and expressing the finest values of awareness. Students develop their work by learning basic camera techniques and darkroom procedures, while they are also introduced to a broad range of fine art photography. Students must have access to a 35mm camera. Can be repeated for credit (with more advanced projects) with permission of the instructor. Lab fee: $150-$200 per course. (1-4 credits) Prerequisite: STC 108/109

FA 332 Photography 2

Photography and New Media 1: Exploring the Boundaries of Photography,Technology and Consciousness

Students explore the basics of digital image-making through traditional photographic methods (aperture, shutter speed, focus, film speed) while being introduced to a variety of techniques to manipulate and alter the digital image. The use of scanners, digital cameras, tablets and software programs such as Photoshop and Illustrator, present a powerful capacity for the artist to create an integrated language of self-expression that starts with the photograph. One of the main goals for the course is for the student to become comfortable moving back and forth between digital and real-world, hand-made methods of image-making. Learning to integrate digital techniques with the richness of texture and layers available from real-world materials allows the student to add a level of depth that cannot be achieved with digital techniques alone. The course is structured through a series of short exercises to introduce photography, digital software and digital manipulation techniques. Students then explore a series of work that shows a clear progression and development of techniques and themes. Topics include: digital vs. physical methods of image-making, how the integration of digital and physical methods affect image-making and meaning, image transfer techniques, photo-manipulation techniques. Lab fee: $30. (4 credits)

FA 338 Photo and New Media

Photography and New Media 1: Exploring the boundaries of Photography,Technology and Consciousness

Students explore the basics of digital image-making through traditional photographic methods (aperture, shutter speed, focus, film speed) while being introduced to a variety of techniques to manipulate and alter the digital image. The use of scanners, digital cameras, tablets and software programs such as Photoshop and Illustrator, present a powerful capacity for the artist to create an integrated language of self-expression that starts with the photograph. One of the main goals for the course is for the student to become comfortable moving back and forth between digital and real-world, hand-made methods of image-making. Learning to integrate digital techniques with the richness of texture and layers available from real-world materials allows the student to add a level of depth that cannot be achieved with digital techniques alone. The course is structured through a series of short exercises to introduce photography, digital software and digital manipulation techniques. Students then explore a series of work that shows a clear progression and development of techniques and themes. Topics include: digital vs. physical methods of image-making, how the integration of digital and physical methods affect image-making and meaning, image transfer techniques, photo-manipulation techniques. Lab fee: $30. (4 credits)

FA 339 Photo and New Media 2

Photography and New Media 2: Integrating Photography, Technology and Consciousness

This course explores the outer boundaries of photography by integrating traditional photography methods (aperture, shutter speed, focus, film speed) with new possibilities presented by using the computer to explore layering, adding text, hand drawing, or other digital manipulation. The use of scanners, digital cameras, tablets and software programs such as Photoshop and Illustrator, present a powerful capacity for the artist to create an integrated language of self-expression that starts with the photograph. Students will harness the power of both digital tools and physical methods of making to create works that satisfy their artistic aspirations. For example, work could be done mostly in the digital realm while being supplemented and enriched by hand-drawing, scanned items/textures, etc., or the computer could be used just as a way to research and test images that then are created in the physical world. Students explore and refine their creative process in a series of work that hows a clear progression and development of techniques and themes. Topics include: appropriate use of digital uniques, the photograph vs. reality, how meaning relates to methods of image-making, how photo manipulation affects meaning, presentation of work to the public. Lab fee: $50 for materials. (4 credits) Prerequisites: FA 338 or consent of the instructor.

FA 341 Ceramics 1

Ceramics 1, Shaping the Unmanifest: Clay Forming, Glazing and Firing through Handbuilding Methods

Students learn the entire process of ceramics from making clay to firing pottery, providing them with the basic skills necessary to express consciousness in matter in this medium. Topics include: addressing the vessel with handbuilding methods such as pinch, coil and slab construction; basic glazing methods; earthenware, stoneware, and raku firing methods. Lab fee: $45. (4 credits) Prerequisite: STC 108/109

FA 342 Ceramics 2

Ceramics 2, Shaping the Unmanifest: Throwing Pottery Forms on the Wheel

Wheelthrowing opens a new dimension of experience for the student potter. The challenge to center and form a pot while the clay is spinning through the hands leads to a synchronicity that powerfully connects potter and pot, consciousness and matter, in the process of creation. This intensive course focuses on establishing the student’s basic wheelthrowing skills with simple forms. Topics include: addressing form, glazing and function in wheel work. Lab fee: $45. (4 credits) Prerequisite: FA341 or consent of instructor

FA 343 Ceramics 3

Ceramics 3, Shaping the Unmanifest: Integration of Surface and Form through Enlivening Color and Pattern

The integration of surface and form is a further development of the connection of inner and outer aspects of the ceramic form. Students continue to develop and integrate handbuilding and wheelthrowing methods of forming. Topics include: specific focus on exploring glaze, and surface possibilities such as drawing, color, texture, and their relation to the aesthetic and functional components of ceramics. Lab fee: $45. (4 credits) Prerequisite: FA341 and 342 or consent of instructor

FA 344 Ceramics 4

Sculpture 1, Bas Relief: Breathing Life into Matter

By exploring organic forms and creating designs from imagination, students make original sculptural surfaces that emerge from a two-dimensional plane. Exercises that expand the capacity to envision and create give students a deeper appreciation of the nature, creation, and function of sculpture, and thus the opportunity to express the fundamental laws that structure form in the natural world. Topics include: low, middle and high relief; organizing principles of two and three-dimensional design (balance, rhythm, economy, etc.); light and shadow; transforming clay reliefs into plaster reliefs; the history of relief sculpture. Materials: paper/cardboard, clay and plaster. Materials fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisite: STC 108/109

FA 351 Sculpture 1

Sculpture 1, Bas Relief: Breathing Life into Matter

By exploring organic forms and creating designs from imagination, students make original sculptural surfaces that emerge from a two-dimensional plane. Exercises that expand the capacity to envision and create give students a deeper appreciation of the nature, creation, and function of sculpture, and thus the opportunity to express the fundamental laws that structure form in the natural world. Topics include: low, middle and high relief; organizing principles of two and three-dimensional design (balance, rhythm, economy, etc.); light and shadow; transforming clay reliefs into plaster reliefs; the history of relief sculpture. Materials: paper/cardboard, clay and plaster. Materials fee: $40. (4 credits) Prerequisite: STC 108/109

FA 352 Sculpture 2

Sculpture 2, The Portrait: Mirroring the Self

Students continue the exploration and expression of form on a more personal level – they have the opportunity to mirror the different layers of their own consciousness in lifelike self-portraits. Students experience the controlled creation and evolution of their portrait as they sculpt in clay, transform the portrait into plaster, and cast the finished work in porcelain. Topics include drawing the portrait (contour and tonal); sculpting the portrait; working from observation; organizing principles of three-dimensional design; proportion; form relationships; making plaster molds; slip casting; photographing sculpture; and the history of portrait sculpture. Materials: clay, plaster, and porcelain slip (liquid clay). Materials fee: $40. Prerequisite: FA 351 (4 credits)

FA 353 Sculpture 3

Sculpture 3, The Figure: Embodying the Fullness of Consciousness

This course emphasizes sculpting the human figure, which has the potential to embody the fullness of consciousness within the cosmos. Students continue to explore the principles that structure form. In addition, they develop skills and gain the technological know-how for sculpting, mold-making, casting, making limited editions, and mass production. Topics include drawing the figure (contour and tonal); principles of three-dimensional design; making an armature; sculpting the figure in clay; working from observation; form/space relationship; proportion; anatomy (skeletal and musculature); mold-making, casting slip (liquid clay); the history of figure sculpture. Materials: clay, plaster and slip. Materials fee: $40. Prerequisites: FA 351, FA 352 (4 credits)

FA 355 Environmental Art

Environmental Art: Harmoniously Enriching and Giving Meaning to the Environment

In this studio course students gain knowledge of earthworks and land art from prehistoric civilizations to today’s contemporary artists, including Stonehenge, the Adena Serpent Mound, Robert Smithson’s Spiral Jetty, Maya Lin’s Wave Field and Viet Nam Memorial, Christo’s Running Fence, etc. Working individually and as a group, students explore a number of assignments/projects and create environmental art that considers the delicate balance between form, function and place. Course Fee: $25. (4 credits)

FA 357 Alternative Approaches to Sculpture

Engaging Infinite Correlation

This course will allow students to explore possibilities of alternative conditions for making sculpture. Through the use of event-based and performative processes, students will ask questions and experiment with the balance of control and freedom in the creative process as well as the occurrence of art forms that seem to happen spontaneously and seemingly in the absence of any obvious design. Consideration of form, process, and idea will play an important role in structuring each student’s creative method. Art historical references include: John Cage’s experimental processes, fluxus events, collage, readymade, performance and participatory artwork. Class hours will be split between hands-on fabrication, group-discussion, and critique. Materials fee: $50. (4 credits)

FA 373 Visiting Artist Studio

Visiting Artist Studio: Exploring the Relationship of Parts to Whole in the Work of Art

This is an opportunity to study with visiting faculty who present topics in two-dimensional, three-dimensional, time-based and/or new media disciplines. The course is tailored to all levels – beginning through advanced. Topics include formal and conceptual approaches, contrasting contemporary with historical viewpoints, exploring materials, tools, and methods, and developing the creative process. This course will emphasize the development of a broad comprehension and the ability to focus – the relationship of parts to whole in the work of art. (1-4 credits) Prerequisite: STC 108/109

FA 398 Fieldwork/Internship

Fieldwork: Applying Studio Knowledge in Practical Situations to Strengthen Action, Achievement, and Fulfillment

Students study or apprentice with an artist or art-related professional or facility, with the approval of their major advisor. Students document their experiences in sketchbooks and journals, and connect what they are learning to their knowledge and experience of consciousness. Fieldwork must be completed at least two months before graduation. Prerequisite: consent of the Art faculty. (1-4 credits)

FA 399 Art Directed Study

Knowledge Is Structured in Consciousness

Directed study courses are offered in rare circumstances to advanced and academically self-sufficient students who need a course to graduate and are unable to take the regular course due to extraordinary circumstances. (variable credits) Prerequisite: consent of the art faculty and the Academic Standards Committee

The 20 credits of electives may include up to 12 credits from these Media and Communications courses:

FA 204 The Spiritual Quest in Media, Myth, and Myself

CCTS: The Spiritual Quest in Media, Myth, and Myself & The Hero’s Journey as the Development of Consciousness

Students explore their own spiritual quest in the light of the wisdom shared in great mythic stories, focusing on epics, mythology, and modern films. Drawing upon the insights of scholars of myth such as Joseph Campbell, students identify the universal stages of the quest archetype: the hero’s journey as he or she evolves to higher states of awareness. Students critically evaluate theories of consciousness and analyze how they can illuminate mythic stories and their own life. In the culminating course project, students create their own mythic stories that reflect their personal vision and the transformation of consciousness. Topics include: the power of myth, archetypal characters and events, the love story archetype, the inspiration of ancient epics and myths, adapting ancient stories to modern situations, plot structure and character development.

Textbook fee: $15

(4 credits)

Prerequisites: STC 108, taken during students’ first semester or with consent of the Department faculty

MC 282 Video Production

Video Production: Understanding and Applying the Aesthetics of Motion Pictures and the Technologies of Digital Video to Transform the World with a Vision of Unbounded Possibilities

Students learn the basic skills of video production by participating in the production of a variety of different scenes and subjects. Students will learn to handle and care for production apparatus including lights, cameras, and sound equipment, and will learn the different roles to be played in the process of shooting a video, including director, director of photography, gaffer, grip, electrician, art department, assistant directors, and production assistants. Lab fee: $150. (4 credits) Prerequisite: STC 108/109

MC 284 Video Editing

Video Editing: Utilizing Digital Tools for Capturing, Cutting, Sequencing, and Compositing Sound and Image to Create Artistic Wholeness

Video editing requires the students to be able to synthesize all the different elements of their video into a greater whole. Students produce and direct video productions, and then complete them in the Department’s nonlinear digital video editing lab with a particular emphasis on creative approaches to editing. For inspiration, students analyze examples of great camera work, lighting, mise-en-scene, and montage. Topics include the language of the moving image, the 180 degree system, Murch’s Rule of Six, and principles of dramatic unity; shot selection, cutting techniques, sound mixing, and color correction; special effects, filters, keys, and key frames. Lab fee: $150. (4 credits) Prerequisite: MC 282

MC 300 Narrative 1

Unifying and Unfolding the Full Range of Human Experience

This course examines the essential role of narrative in the creation of all forms of media. From the very beginnings of human records, whether it is mythology, scripture, literature, or the earliest cave paintings, the creators of these works have always told their audience a story or imparted a message by the use of narrative. In order to work in any creative medium, understanding the various ways in which narrative is used is a great advantage. This course will examine the range of narrative forms and narrative devices that have been used since the dawn of time right up until the modern day. We will discover that although the forms and types of media used might have changed as technology has advanced, in fact, most of the essential forms of narrative used in creative works have been with us for ages. Understanding why will reveal how narrative reflects both the universal and unique aspects of the experience of human life. As part of the course students will be required to undertake projects that aid the development of their own narrative skills. Lab fee: $40. (4 credits)

MC 316 Creative Filmmaking (8 credits)

Painting 3: Growth of the Artist through Refinement of Perception and the Expansion of the Methods and Materials of Painting

Painting expresses the artist’s connection with the deep laws fundamental to seeing and creating visual images. Students are immersed in the fundamentals of drawing and painting from nature and a variety of other subject matter. The curriculum addresses the students’ development of formal and technical skills along with a conceptual and critical understanding of the language of painting as preparation for independent studio work. Can be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor. (1-4 credits) Prerequisite: FA 311, 312 or consent of instructor

MC 363 Web Design and Web Animation 1

Web Design and Web Animation 1: Creating Digital Art in a Self-Interactive Universe

Students undertake study of XHTML, Cascading Style Sheets, and principles of design for dynamic media, which they apply in the creation of a portfolio of beautiful, highly functional, standards-compliant, and highly usable Web pages. Topics include: creative approaches to Web design; XHTML syntax, tags, attributes, entities, DTDs and validation; CSS; creating hierarchies with color, type, and imagery; principles of usability for interactive media; using a visual lexicon for designer-client communication; examples of outstanding Web design studios; homesteading the noosphere. Lab fee: $150. Prerequisite: MC 260, FA 361 or equivalent experience. (4 credits)

MC 365 Web Design and Web Animation 2

Web Design and Web Animation 2: Integrating Interactive Vector Graphics, Animation, 3-D, Video, and Audio to Create Illuminating User Experiences

Students learn to use advanced tools for Web design and interactive animation, 3-D, and video, to build richly interactive Web sites that inspire the viewer. Topics include Web 2.0; conceptualizing the user experience; creating innovative and elegant user interfaces; interactive vector graphics animation; content management systems; 3-D animation for the Web; streaming video; creating cinematic user interfaces. Lab fee: $150. Prerequisites: MC 363 or equivalent experience. (4 credits)

MC 366 Graphic Design for Media and Communications

Graphic Design for Media and Communications I: Integrating Medium and Message

This course provides students with the basic practical knowledge and skills needed to create effective visual design using current and critical tools and techniques. Students focus on developing their graphic design skills for personal and professional usage using Photoshop and InDesign. Topics include: digital imaging and page layout tools; principles and elements of visual design; color theory, layout design; basic principles and history of typography; brand design; use of digital photography; and copyright law. Lab fee: $150. (4 credits) Prerequisite: STC 108/109.

MC 368 Graphic Design for the Web

Graphic Design for Media and Communications I: Integrating Medium and Message

This course provides students with the basic practical knowledge and skills needed to create effective visual design using current and critical tools and techniques. Students focus on developing their graphic design skills for personal and professional usage using Photoshop and InDesign. Topics include: digital imaging and page layout tools; principles and elements of visual design; color theory, layout design; basic principles and history of typography; brand design; use of digital photography; and copyright law. Lab fee: $150. (4 credits) Prerequisite: STC 108/109.

To enrich their BA experience, students may take a course in Creative Musical Arts as an elective.

Plus field trips

All majors will have the opportunity to take a 3–5 day field trip or longer each semester to a major metropolitan area to visit museums and galleries as part of their degree requirements. The cost of the field trips is approximately $200–300, or more, per semester.

Plus visiting artists

Students meet several times a year with visiting artists who come to campus at the invitation of the Department. These meetings may fall outside regular class times, including Sundays or weekends between courses, but attendance is a degree requirement.

Plus successful completion of a portfolio (slides, CD-Rom, or videotape) review

Dale Divoky
  • Associate Professor of Art

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Gyan Shrosbree
  • Assistant Professor of Art

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