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Vol. 14, #16, May 26, 1999
Copyright 1999, Maharishi University of Management

Headlines

Journal Article Shows Yogic Flying Lowers Violent Crime
Dr. John Hagelin Presents Peace on National Television
Faculty Apartment Building Now Under Construction
Student Peace Initiative Includes Yogic Flying on TV
Organic Farming Course To Be Offered in Block 10
Student Teachers to Speak on Experience in Regional Schools
Writing Student Publishes 10 Articles
Students To Perform School for Scandal
Scholarships, Child Care to Aid Dome Attendance
Funds Raised For Large Groups of Yogic Flyers
Student's Artwork Displayed in Stores Nationwide
VP Pearson Presents at International Conference
Campus Veterans Inaugurate Center for Military Science
School Student's Art to Hang in Nation's Capitol

Journal Article Shows Yogic Flying Lowers Violent Crime

Clear evidence that Yogic Flying can reduce violent crime and create an atmosphere of coherence and order is presented in an article in the current issue of Social Indicators Research, a leading journal in the social sciences.

Widely known as the Group for a Government project that took place in the summer of 1993 in Washington, D.C., the experiment brought together 4,000 Yogic Flyers over a 60-day period, resulting in a nearly 25% decrease in the rate of violent crime.

Researchers predicted in ad-vance that the calming influence of the practice of Yogic Flying could reduce violent crime by over 20%. In fact, the findings later showed that the rate of violent crime was reduced by 23%.

The odds of this occurring by chance are less than 2 in one billion, said Maxwell Rainforth, a co-author of the study and the University's chief statistician. Rigorous statistical analyses ruled out an extensive list of alternative explanations.

The experiment was rigorously analyzed by a 27-member review board composed of independent scientists who verified the validity of the research protocol, methodology, and data analysis.

"I think the claim can be plausibly made that the potential impact of this research exceeds that of any other ongoing social or psychological research program," said David Edwards, Ph.D., professor of government at the University of Texas at Austin, commenting on earlier studies of Yogic Flying. "It has survived a broader array of statistical tests than most research in the field of conflict resolution. This work and the theory that informs it deserve the most serious consideration by academics and policy makers alike."

Headlines

Dr. John Hagelin Presents Peace on National Television

BY ALESIA LLOYD

Maharishi's technology for creating world peace was prominently featured recently on the nationally aired "Roseanne Show," which hosted University faculty member John Hagelin and a group of four Yogic Flyers, including two students.

Dr. Hagelin, who is currently on a speaking tour to raise awareness of peaceful solutions to violence through Maharishi's Technologies of Consciousness, was eagerly interviewed by Roseanne in a ten-minute segment which focused on how Yogic Flying could be used to quell the situation in Kosovo.

A brief Yogic Flying demonstration was then given by Yogic Flying Club members Rod Falk, Ted Hirsch, and Noah Schechtman, as well as Purusha member Eddie Gob.

"The show went well," said Mr. Hirsch. "Roseanne was open and receptive to the knowledge and was eager to understand how it could be applied to the Kosovo situation."

Dr. Hagelin was warmly received by Roseanne, who had just finished interviewing Neale Donald Walsch, a best-selling author who praised Dr. Hagelin highly as a scientist who has presented evidence to support the unified field theory--or superstring theory.

"It's very fortunate that John is being given this opportunity to enliven the knowledge of the power of consciousness in public awareness," said Sally Peden, assistant to Dr. Hagelin at the Institute of Science, Technology and Public Policy.

Headlines

Faculty Apartment Building Now Under Construction

BY ALESIA LLOYD

Yet another construction project is under way as the groundbreaking for a new apartment building for single faculty signifies the University's strong commitment to reconstructing the campus according to principles of Maharishi Sthapatya Veda design.

The new apartments, which will be located directly south of Building 152, will each provide 700 square feet of living space for 12 University and Maharishi School faculty.

According to David Todt, who returned from working in Holland last fall to manage new construction on campus, each apartment will have a bedroom, kitchenette, bathroom, and living room.

"This is just the beginning of the reconstruction of the University campus," Mr. Todt said. "Maharishi's knowledge and those who represent it deserve to be housed in buildings that are in accord with Natural Law."

Guidelines for building in accord with Maharishi Sthapatya Veda design are being strongly adhered to, including the use of all natural building materials such as cedar siding, wool carpeting, and tile floors. The apartments are also being designed to be as quiet as possible.

Construction of the two-story apartment building is scheduled to begin immediately, with a target completion date for this fall.

Headlines

Student Peace Initiative Includes Yogic Flying on TV

BY JOSEPH GERACE

The students' Peace Practicum continues to play a major role in the campaign to bring peace to Kosovo, via media contacts, fundraising, and Yogic Flying demonstrations--including a high-flying performance on the "Roseanne Show" on national TV.

Students have organized and presented Yogic Flying demonstrations in Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Oklahoma, Texas, Kentucky, Ohio, Wyoming, Colorado, and Arkansas. And they've been busy calling the press to publicize both those demonstrations and the Maharishi Endowment Fund for Perpetual World Peace.

"It is the time for dynamic action, to let the arrow fly after we fly in the Dome," said Marjan de Jong, a student from Holland who has been involved in the course.

One of the main focuses of the class has been to set up Yogic Flying demonstrations to get the word out that the Technology of the Unified Field is the only technology that will solve the problem of violence around the world.

"Our team set up a Yogic Flying Demonstration in Grinnell on a Saturday night, and it was very well received," said Eero Tunkelo from Finland. "Several Grinnell students wanted to learn the Transcendental Meditation® technique so they could do their part for World Peace."

In addition to emphasizing the need for Yogic Flyers to create world peace, the students have also been emphasizing the local angle, especially in the wake of events at Columbine High School. "We need to hit the point home to the press that this IS a local story," Mr. Tunkelo said.

"Violence can erupt anywhere, and we must get the press to cover this story with the same enthusiasm that they cover a sporting event such as the Super Bowl," said Joel Kamano, a student from Kenya.

In addition, the students have been doing their part to help increase the numbers of Yogic Flyers in the Domes on campus. They played a key role in raising $43,000 to help provide scholarships for those who wanted to learn the TM-Sidhi® program but weren't able to afford it.

"We are exceptionally pleased with all of the students in the class. Their dedication, focus, and dy-namism is inspiring," said course instructor Jane Schmidt-Wilk. "They are taking this project very seriously. It is not just another class, it is the urgently needed action to smooth out the transition to Heaven on Earth."

SCI 407, Practicum in Peace Studies, began in Block 8 and has been continued into Block 9.

Headlines

Organic Farming Course To Be Offered in Block 10

BY ALESIA LLOYD

Get ready to get your hands dirty as the new organic vegetable farming course is scheduled to be offered through Continuing Education during Block 10 (June 7-July 1).

University students are also welcome to enroll in "Organic Vegetable Production," a course designed to give practical experience in growing organic produce.

Taught by University biology faculty Steve McLaskey, this course will provide both classroom time and hands-on experience, focusing on topics such as choosing a site for a garden, preparing topsoil, making organic fertilizer, planting and transplanting, and proper irrigation.

"I plan to go into detail on all the major vegetables which grow in this area, including pests and diseases which are unique to each," Dr. McLaskey said. "Also I will provide invaluable tips on growing, harvesting, and storing vegetables."

Dr. McLaskey will also focus on how to extend the growing season (growing later into the fall season) using simple techniques.

"This course will give practical information that anyone can use to grow a personal garden--or even for larger scale production designed for the market," he said.

Dr. McLaskey, who received his Ph.D. in horticulture with a focus on vegetable crops, has been running the University's vegetable garden for almost three years and feels that organic farming is vital means of food production.

"There are a lot of influences in agriculture today which are not beneficial to the consumer. It is now more important than ever that we become closer to our food supply in order to ensure its quality."

To enroll through Continuing Education, call 472-1135.

Headlines

Student Teachers to Speak on Experience in Regional Schools

Five education students who have recently completed 14 weeks of student teaching in the region will present their experiences to interested students at an informal meeting on Sunday, May 30, at 8:15 p.m. in Vishwakarma room 111.

The students taught in Fairfield, Washington, and Van Buren public schools, as well as at Maharishi School, according to Chris Jones, head of the education department.

"The students are moving out into the public arena more than ever before and are doing very well," Dr. Jones said. "We're pleased. And we're satisfied that the Consciousness-Based approach to training teachers is proving itself in the public schools."

David Flusche taught journalism in both the Fairfield and Washington public high schools. Karuna Redlin, David Carter, and Nick Mark taught at the elementary level. And Gwen Cannon taught secondary school art.

The students felt well prepared. "The teacher education program at Maharishi University of Management is project-oriented," Mr. Carter said. "As a student I had to come up with ideas, and create units and lessons to teach. Other programs I have experienced are more lecture-based. Yet as a teacher your creativity is continually being tested. The education program here helped prepare me for this. And in this way the courses were very practical."

"They did well. Their recommendations on the whole were very laudatory," Dr. Jones said. And their specialized skills are in increasing demand. "We're now getting re-quests for teachers who have a teaching degree and knowledge of SCI," he said. Two requests have come recently, one from a public school that has introduced the Transcendental Meditation technique, and the other is a social services agency.

Headlines

Writing Student Publishes 10 Articles

Karen Hogle, a student in the M.A. in Professional Writing, has had five articles published and has five more coming out soon in regional magazines.

During an eight-week internship for The Iowan last fall, Ms. Hogle wrote eight short articles. The editor was impressed with her writing, and after her internship was over, he invited her to write more articles.

Ms. Hogle accommodated him by writing a feature article on the Blue Bird Bus Company in Mt. Pleasant, which has been published in Iowa Commerce. And she wrote a feature article on a new children's museum in Iowa City which will be published in a forthcoming issue of The Iowan.

"I'm pleased with Karen's accomplishment," said Jim Karpen, director of the Professional Writing Program. "We've had many students get published in magazines, but only a few have been as productive."

The topics for her shorter articles that have now been published included a theater museum in Mt. Pleasant, a restaurant in Albia, Radiance Dairy in Fairfield, and artists in Van Buren County.

"The Professional Writing program has changed by life," Ms. Hogle said. "I attribute much of my success to my mentor Jim Karpen and the other enlightened faculty. I highly recommend the program for anyone who has the slightest interest in writing."

Headlines

Students To Perform School for Scandal

BY SUSAN MARTON

School for Scandal, a satirical comedy presented by the University theater program, is set to open in Spayde Theatre on June 11.

"It's considered to be one of the greatest comedies of all time," said Kent Sugg, the faculty member who is producing the play.

In this initial year of the new theater program, this will be the students' second offering. Cast members include students Noah Siemsen, Casy Sims, Celeste Riegel, Heather Miller, Louise Scherer, Matalin Hatchard, Dagob ten Wolde, George Kelley, and Rig Gelfand. Also appearing is former professional actor Al Constantineau.

School for Scandal, written by Richard Brinsley Sheridan, pokes fun at the social conventions and flaws of upper society set in 1777 Georgian London. The plot surrounds two brothers and the false impressions they give to a society of gossipmongers.

Charles (played by Mr. Kelley) is seen by others to be an "incorrigible rake" who deep down holds a "heart of gold"--but is overshadowed by his brother Joseph (Siemsen), an upstanding member of society who radiates virtue, or so it appears . . . .

Little are they aware that their uncle, a benefactor played by Mr. Constantineau, who also directs, secretly returns to discover which of the two brothers is worthy of receiving his wealth and admiration. However, compulsive gossipers blur the situation as he tries to explore the deeper values of their hearts.

The play will run on Friday and Saturday evenings in June beginning June 11. Tickets are available at the University Bookstore and Somebody Cares. The cost is $8 for general admission and $5 for students, staff, and faculty. Mr. Sugg said that all profits will support the revolving Dome scholarship fund and the TM-Sidhi scholarship fund.

Headlines

Scholarships, Child Care to Aid Dome Attendance

BY ALESIA LLOYD

Revolving Dome scholarships and late-afternoon child care are two important breakthroughs the University has made in its efforts to create a permanent group of 1650 Yogic Flyers in the Domes.

The University, which has been working tirelessly to increase Super Radiance attendance to 1,650 (the square root of one percent of the current U.S. population), is eager to make it easier for everyone to be in the Domes.

According to John Kennedy, of the University's Department for the Development of Consciousness, revolving scholarships are now available to assist those individuals in town who are not able to attend the Dome for financial reasons.

"Anybody can apply for these scholarships. All you have to do is fill out a simple application," Mr. Kennedy said. The scholarships are based on an honor system with no formal documentation of income.

Late afternoon child care has also been made available at a reduced cost to help make it easier for mothers to attend the 5:00 p.m. Super Radiance program.

Child care, which is held at the at the nearby Maharishi Preschool for the Age of Enlightenment, is open to children ages 2-11 years, for a special cost of $2 per program.

Craig Pearson, University executive vice president, wants to encourage everyone to attend the Domes. "Participating in large group programs in the Golden Domes is the single most important thing each of us can do. We have the power to create the coherence necessary to bring about a positive change to our nation's actions in Kosovo."

Dome scholarship applications are available at Everybody's, My Lucky Day, and the Department for the Development of Consciousness (Building 109) on campus. Please direct any child-care questions to Michelle Caldwell at 472-2828.

Headlines

Funds Raised For Large Groups of Yogic Flyers

At a special meeting in the Dome on May 12, Dr. John Hagelin, director of the Instutute of Science, Technology and Public Policy, announced that several million dollars had been raised to help create large groups of Yogic Flyers, a first step in a larger initiative to raise hundreds of millions of dollars from wealthy donors.

Dr. Hagelin said that 1,000 experts in advanced Vedic technologies of peace keeping are being deployed to the different Time Zone Capitals of the world, and that scientists have begun planning research that will chronicle the transition from war to peace.

The research will be modeled after the 1993 Group for a Government study in Washington, D.C., said Fred Travis, chairman of the psychology department. Faculty researchers are again planning to have a project review board, to declare in advance the variables that will be measured, and to lodge "change scores" with the board.

Faculty and other volunteers have sent out a mailing to 3,400 of the wealthiest individuals in the U.S. inviting them to contribute. The goal is to eventually raise hundreds of millions of dollars

Headlines

Student's Artwork Displayed in Stores Nationwide

Film and business student Roland Wells has designed an end-aisle supermarket display for a food distribution company which is beginning a nationwide promotion in over 70 stores this month.

Fairfield company Thalia Foods, Inc., imports and distributes high-quality Italian foods to gourmet stores throughout the U.S. Mr. Wells was contracted to design the promotional display, which is now being used in large supermarkets in major metropolitan areas.

"It was a logical step since I was working part-time at the company as warehouse and accounting manager," Mr. Wells said. "I knew the stock and the feeling that the company wanted to express about its products, and then enjoyed putting it all together in the display. Another bonus has been that when I started my business classes, I quickly related to the knowledge based on my varied experience from working at the company."

Headlines

VP Pearson Presents at International Conference

BY GERRY CONNOLLY

Executive Vice President Craig Pearson last month presented the University's system of Consciousness-Based education at the 10th International Conference on College Teaching and Learning in Jacksonville, Florida.

According to Mr. Pearson, his presentation on the enhancement of classroom learning by systematic development of consciousness was well received at the conference, which was attended by over 900 college educators.

With an elaborate PowerPoint presentation, he introduced the University's approach to making full use of the students' total brain functioning through the Transcendental Meditation and TM-Sidhi® programs, including Yogic Flying, and the teaching strategies practiced at the University.

A professor of music from a Chicago college expressed keen interest and plans to visit the University soon. And a professor of writing requested advice on how to launch a pilot program utilizing the Transcendental Meditation technique at her college.

"My presentation also made the point that however up to date the teaching strategies and however high-tech the classroom facilities, learning nonetheless depends on the alertness and receptivity of the students, a factor over which teachers traditionally have little or no control," Mr. Pearson said. "Consciousness-Based education directly promotes development of the learning ability of the student."

Headlines

Campus Veterans Inaugurate Center for Military Science

BY JOSEPH GERACE

On Wednesday, May 12, several campus veterans of the U.S. military inaugurated the Center for Advanced Military Science, which will promote the use of the only proven method for creating peace: Yogic Flying.

"All other weapons are obsolete," said retired Army Major Barry Cave. "We can give the military in every nation a better weapon, one that will actually provide invincibility for the nation."

Major Cave said that every nation should have its military trained to prevent conflict and create invincibility for itself by using Maharishi's Absolute Theory of Defense.

In addition to Major Cave, who served as an Army field artillery officer in Vietnam, other founding members include Navy Seal Ensign Dan Burke, a University graduate; former Air Force fighter pilot Lt. Col. Richard Neate, dean of men; former Marine Ron Khare, a student; and former Marine Robert Herron, a faculty member.

The acting director of the Center will be Dr. Herron, who is eager to reenliven the original framework of the MIU Institute of Advanced Military Science and conduct workshops and conferences for military officers.

Commenting on the role that the Center will play as it teaches advanced military science, Dr. Herron said, "The military's job is to create and maintain order in society. This protects our evolution. So, the military's real job, its most important job, is to protect our evolution. We are moving the military from one that uses destructive means of creating and maintaining order in society to one that uses creative, nourishing, and life-supporting means of creating order in society."

Headlines

School Student's Art to Hang in Nation's Capitol

Shannon Koelblinger, an 11th-grade student at Maharishi School, has recently won first place in the Congressional High School Art Contest.

Ms. Koelblinger's pencil drawing will be displayed at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., for a year.

Her entry will be the only one from Iowa, and it will be exhibited along with 200 others in the connecting passageway between the U.S. House of Representatives office buildings and the U.S. Capitol building. She will attend an award ceremony in June in Washington, D.C.

According to her teacher, Greg Thatcher, this 18th annual competition for high school students, titled "An Artistic Discovery," was held at Central College in Pella and was hosted by 3rd District Congressman Leonard Boswell.

Headlines

 

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The Review is written and produced approximately twice a month during the academic year by the students in the Professional Writing program at Maharishi University of Management. Send comments to Jim Karpen at jkarpen@lisco.com