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Fairfield News

Vol. 12, #12, April 30, 1997
Copyright 1997, Maharishi University of Management

Researchers Publish Two New Papers on Heart Disease
Kalash To Be Placed Atop Newly Renovated Bagambhrini Dome
Students, Faculty Spend Spring Break in Flight
Math Paper Excites New York Banking Conference
Date Set for Leadership Training Course at Vlodrop
Eco-Jam '97 Raises Funds for Trees
Tropical Night Hits Fairfield in May
Math Festival Attracts Area H.S. Students
School Science Teachers Present Conference Papers

Researchers Publish Two New Papers on Heart Disease

Alumni and faculty of the College of Maharishi Consciousness-Based Health Care recently published two more papers on cardiovascular disease.

Ph.D. graduate Stig Wenneberg and faculty Robert Schneider, Ken Walton, John Salerno, and colleagues published a paper in the International Journal of Neuroscience further demonstrating the ability of the Transcendental Meditation technique to lower blood pressure.

According to Dr. Schneider, the significance of the study is that it investigated a potential mechanism by which the Transcendental Meditation technique could lower blood pressure. He said that it is believed that hypertension is the result of excessive reactivity to stress. Practitioners of the Transcendental Meditation technique were found to retain their ability to react to stress but their long-term blood pressure was significantly lower than subjects in a stress education program.

Two other significant features of the study were that the blood pressure of subjects was measured in real life with high-tech ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Also this was a randomized controlled blinded trial with young men with otherwise normal blood pressure. According to Dr. Schneider this shows potential for prevention of hypertension rather than treatment.

In addition, The Journal of the National Medical Association, a major journal dealing with health issues affecting African Americans, will soon carry a major review article by Dr. Vernon Barnes, Dr. Schneider, Dr. Skip Alexander, and colleagues. Titled "Stress, Stress Reduction, and Hypertension in African Americans: An Updated Review," this article reviews the major causes, treatments, and preventive modalities for hypertension in African Americans and highlights the role of psychosocial and environmental stress.

Hypertension is widely considered the number one public health problem in the adult African American community because it is more common, more severe, and less adequately treated than in other communities. The article reviews the published scientific research indicating that the Transcendental Meditation program offers an effective solution to preventing and treating this public health problem--without harmful side effects and with positive side benefits.

Headlines

Kalash To Be Placed Atop Newly Renovated Bagambhrini Dome

A seven-and-one-half-foot sculpture, work of faculty art professor Dale Divoky, is now complete and is being installed on top of the Bagambhrini Dome of Pure Knowledge as part of the current renovations.

In the shape of a kalash, the sculpture is based on a traditional form in India. According to the tradition, placement of this shape on top of buildings enhances the health and happiness of the occupants.

Mr. Divoky has begun a second sculpture which will reside atop the Maharishi Patanjali Golden Dome. The idea for the sculptures came from University President Dr. Bevan Morris.

According to Mr. Divoky, the sculpture is made of lightweight fiber-reinforced acrylic resin. He made the original model out of plaster, then put rubber molds over the original, and then cast the resin into these molds.

Students helped with the project, with special focus from Michael Gulnac and Eric Sczuka. The effect of the shape, according to Mr. Divoky, was so enlivening that he and the students noticed it as they worked. "The students who helped on the kalash said that it was a powerful experience," Mr. Divoky said. "And whenever I work on it, it simply makes me feel good. After it was finished I would look forward to going to the studio because I knew it was waiting there."

Mr. Divoky said that he is especially pleased to be beautifying the Domes because of the role they've played in the community. "We all love the Domes, they're very special to us," he said. "They are a place where we all meet together and grow together. It feels very good that we can now adorn them, put a crown on them."

According to Mr. Divoky, the diameter of the base is five feet, not large enough to obscure the skylights in the Dome, which have a diameter of 15 feet from end to end. Looking upward, occupants will see the fluted ridges of the kalash.

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Students, Faculty Spend Spring Break in Flight

BY DEBBIE THOMPSON

This spring break, four University students and a faculty advisor spent their week demonstrating Yogic Flying in Northern California, inspiring many to learn the Transcendental Meditation® technique.

The group was led by Student Body President Kristina Van Dyke, and included Peetu Melwani, president of the Yogic Flying Club, students Domen Prasnikar and Keith Wegman, and Rod Falk, registrar at Maharishi School.

According to Ms. Van Dyke, the group first visited the Palo Alto Maharishi Vedic University where they presented the technique to a group of about 60 people, mainly meditators. The students expect many of the viewers to become Sidhas. University donors, thrilled with the presentation, were also happy to receive news about the University.

The group later gave demonstrations to about 80 people at the University of Berkeley, at the University of California at Santa Cruz, and at Stanford. They received a great response at each venue, with many signing up to learn the Transcendental Meditation Technique at follow-up lectures.

"I would encourage everyone to participate in Yogic Flying demonstrations for all the students in the world. Maharishi has encouraged us to do that, and it'll take more students," Ms. Van Dyke said.

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Math Paper Excites New York Banking Conference

BY DAVID FLUSCHE

A paper by Valery Kholodnyi, a former research associate in the physics department, and John Price, head of the University math department, recently caused a stir among top bankers at a conference in NYC.

The paper, titled "Foreign Exchange Option Symmetry in a General Market Environment" and presented by Dr Kholodnyi, explained their new mathematical approach to option analysis in a foreign exchange setting. The International Association of Financial Engineers and IEEE conference on computational finance is considered the most important conference in the world in this area. The conference was supported by various financial institutions including JP Morgan Bank, Morgan Stanley, and Merrill Lynch Capital Market.

"Some of the financial houses said this is a shock for the industry--it is the finance for the next century," Dr. Kholodnyi said. The paper was only one of six papers from about 100 submitted that were allowed to be presented orally.

Dr. Kholodnyi is currently vice president of research and development at Royal American International, Inc., which is owned by Integrated Energy Services, LLC.

Headlines

Date Set for Leadership Training Course at Vlodrop

BY OKACHI KPALUKWU

July 6 through 12 are the dates for the Maharishi Global Administration through Natural Law Leadership Training Course to be offered at Vlodrop, Holland.

According to Kristina Van Dyke, student body president, students graduating this academic year (and their spouses) are eligible to attend the course. This also includes Ph.D. students who are graduating this academic year.

"We're pleased to announce to the students that a date has been set for the course, and we hope that it will be a yearly tradition at the University," Ms. Van Dyke said. "This will give Maharishi an opportunity to see the impact his knowledge has on the students, as much as it will give the students an opportunity to meet face-to-face with the Founder of the University."

Graduating students interested in attending the course should contact the Registrar and Financial Aid Office. Financial aid will be available only to those who qualify. Information about the course fee and room and board is not yet available, but will be announced soon. Those planning to attend the course with their spouses are specifically required to contact the Registrar's office as soon as possible.

Members of Student Government and Craig Pearson, dean of faculty, will host an organizational meeting to discuss the details of the course and to answer all questions.

Student Government has researched group travel rates and will be sharing their findings with students. For more information call Student Government at 472-7000 ext. 5150.

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Eco-Jam '97 Raises Funds for Trees

BY DAVID FLUSCHE

Saturday, May 3, is the date for this year's annual student-sponsored Eco-Jam fashion show and dance fund-raiser for the Southeast Iowa Free Tree Project.

"This main fund-raiser for the reforestation project is intended to encourage people to plant trees by giving them away free," said former student Michael Halley. Mr. Halley has been involved with Eco-Jam since its inception five years ago when he was a student, and remains involved because he is part owner in the clothing store that provides selections for the show.

His store, Natural Selections, sells and provides the show with only certified organic fiber clothing. His partner, former student Lonica Kufner, says the organic fiber market is growing so quickly that more styles are available than can be shown.

The master of ceremonies for this year's show will be radio talent and musician Jeffrey Hedquist. Eco-Jam coordinator Taru Kivio says the students look forward to "strutting their stuff."

Eco-Jam is sponsored by the Organization for the New Earth (ONE), a University student organization. ONE has given away an average of 10,000 tree seedlings each year since 1993. Originally the trees were distributed among the community, but now distribution is more oriented toward elementary school children. "Trees go to schools as far away as Cedar Rapids and the Mississippi River, and are distributed during Earth Week in late April," Mr. Halley said.

"We get thank-you letters from some of the kids that show their gratitude for such a simple thing as being given a tree. It's really touching," said Free Tree Coordinator Chris Kice.

The trees chosen for distribution are native to Iowa--this year's selection being a River Birch.

The show will begin at 8:00 p.m. sharp on May 3 at the University Student Union Ballroom. Come early because seating is limited. Advance tickets are available at Natural Selections--$3 for University students and $5 for general admission. Tickets will be $1 more at the door. The dance begins at 9:30 and will continue until midnight.

Headlines

Tropical Night Hits Fairfield in May

BY DEBBIE THOMPSON

On Saturday May 10, Fairfielders will experience a "Tropical Night" featuring dances, fashion show, and other cultural performances organized by members of the University's African Students Club.

According to Club President Therese Muleka, the community can look forward to traditional dances from Mozambique and Zaire, including the popular Boot Dance that excited the audience at last year's show.

In addition, a special guest performer from Trinidad and Tobago will entertain the crowd on the steelpan, a musical invention of African descendants of that country. This highly experienced professional has performed for Queen Elizabeth of England and the former Prime Minister of India, Mrs. Indira Gandhi, among others.

Ms. Muleka herself also plans to sing in Lingala, her Zairean mother tongue, while other students are planning to put on short skits.

"It's a very good thing to do," says Ms. Muleka. "Everything is about sharing what we have with others--our way of dressing and thinking."

Okachi Kpalukwu, editor of the club's newsletter, The Kilimanjaro, feels that the event helps to unite the African students themselves. "It reminds us what being an African is all about. Many Africans don't know what's happening in the next tribe. The show and newsletter help us to share what is happening in various localities. We see we are one because most of the things we do are the same."

The fashion show is being organized by Laura Mendoca, while Tanya Castro is leading the dancers. Nnait Chissano is the show's music specialist. The show will be held at the Student Union ballroom.

Headlines

Math Festival Attracts Area H.S. Students

BY MARY HOLM

Workshops, speakers, videos, and contests were features of this year's fifth annual high school math festival hosted by the University Department of Mathematics.

About 120 students from area high schools attended the southeast Iowa math conference held on campus April 8. "The students were very enthusiastic, and we feel it's the most successful conference we've ever had," said Cathy Gorini, associate professor in the Department of Mathematics. "The most popular event was the lecture on the Transcendental Meditation program for students."

This year's keynote speaker was Michael Lackman from Telegroup, who discussed the applications of mathematics in telecommunications. Other speakers and topics included Dr. Gorini on "The Space We Live In," Dr. Paul Corazza on "The Wonders of Infinity," and Layman Allen on "Games for Thinkers."

Students had a choice of workshops and competed for prizes in the contest room as they solved challenging problems. They also enjoyed computer sessions in the University math lab, such as cryptology for sending secret messages mathematically.

The math festival encourages continued math education and exposes high school students to the relevancy of math and its applications to a wide range of careers, Dr. Gorini said.

Headlines

School Science Teachers Present Conference Papers

Maharishi School science teachers Nina Meade and Cathy Montgomery earlier this month gave a presentation at the National Science Teachers Association 45th National Convention.

Their presentation, "Girls in Science: The Ideal Put into Practice," discussed the experience of students in single-gender classes in a Consciousness-BasedSM school.

According to Ms. Meade, "The audience was very receptive. We began with the success of Maharishi School, focusing on girls' achievement in science and math, then gave a section on the need for single gender education."

The presenters also discussed the role of the Transcendental Meditation technique in developing the full potential of the knower and included reference to the scientific research relevant to education. Their presentation also included a 10-minute clip from the Ideal Girls' School videotape.

The response was enthusiastic, Ms. Meade said, with many of those attending taking packets of information that included a six-page insert on the Transcendental Meditation technique.

Headlines

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Written and produced approximately twice a month during the academic year by the students in the Professional Writing program at Maharishi University of Management. Send comments to Jim Kar;en at jkarpen@lisco.com