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Vol. 16, #16 May 9, 2001
Copyright 2001, Maharishi University of Management

Headlines

Newest Trustee Establishes $5-Million Scholarship Fund

Vedic Medicine Students Learn Maharishi Vedic Astrology

Rotating U. Heads to Thailand in Fall

East Entrance for Men's Dome Slated for Graduation

Anne Hildenbrand Leaves Bequest to University

Students Inspired by Talk by Successful Screenwriter

Concert of Acoustic Music by Canadian Singer/Songwriters

Soccer Club Starts Season Strong, State Reputation High

Chamber Singers Offer Annual Spring Concert

Annual Spring Variety Show

Cantus Angelicus to Present Concert

Faculty Performance Artist to Present in Iowa City in May


Newest Trustee Establishes $5-Million Scholarship Fund

Ramani Ayer, Ph.D., chairman of The Hartford Financial Services Group, has joined the University's Board of Trustees and recently established a $5-million scholarship fund to help disadvantaged students finance their education.

Dr. Ayer is giving $250,000 to the fund over the next five years and has pledged to raise the rest during that period of time by approaching colleagues and friends in the Indo-American community. Dr. Ayer also recently donated $50,000 to the Annual Fund.

"I am absolutely delighted to join the board of a university that is making a distinct contribution by marrying a good educational program with a personal transformation strategy," Dr. Ayer said. "I have personally experienced the very positive benefits of the Transcendental Meditation program."

In 1997 Dr. Ayer was named chairman of The Hartford, an internationally focused financial services enterprise with more than $175 billion in assets.

Dr. Ayer holds a bachelor's degree from the Indian Institute of Technology in Bombay, India, and master's and doctoral degrees in chemical engineering from Drexel University.

He joined The Hartford in 1973 after finishing his doctorate and rose quickly. He was elected senior vice president in 1989 and executive vice president in 1990. A year later he became president and chief operating officer of The Hartford's Property-Casualty Operations.

Headlines

Vedic Medicine Students Learn Maharishi Vedic Astrology

BY ALESIA LLOYD

The world's first course on Maharishi Vedic AstrologySM as it applies to Maharishi Consciousness-Based Health CareSM was taught by Pandit A. Mishra to all students and faculty in the the Vedic Medicine program for the first time last month.

"It is so fascinating to learn and experience the precise and orderly connection of the cosmic physiology and the individual physiology and to understand how useful it is clinically in predicting and promoting health," said Paul Morehead, coordinator of the program.

The course, titled "One-Month Course in Vedic Prevention," has been videotaped for future classes, and it is expected that there will be more courses like it in the curriculum. "Our objective was to learn as much as possible in this one month," Mr. Morehead said. "And over time we will be able to use the Maharishi Jyotish program to prescribe Maharishi Yagya performances as a preventive measure."

Maharishi Vedic Astrology utilizes scientific principles of Natural Law to provide knowledge of the unfoldment of certain tendencies in a person's life, including tendencies for health and disease. This information when used in conjunction with pulse diagnosis can give a broader understanding of the nature of a person's health condition and can even give a clue about when a disease may manifest so that actions may be taken to avoid disease before it arises.

Mr. Morehead said that the use of Maharishi Vedic Astrology is especially important for preventing disease because the knowledge of when to prescribe procedures to neutralize any negativity, such as Maharishi Yagya performances, herbal recommendations, and dietary recommendations, can enhance their positive effects. It can be as much of a benefit to the patient as the knowledge of what the disease is.

"This knowledge is naturally so valuable for health," Mr. Morehead said. "It aids in knowing the timing and nature of the condition, and more importantly, helps us to know which procedures will be effective when."

The goal is prevention, and ultimately the role of practitioners is not to help cure illness but to avoid it. Neil Sims, who is currently a Ph.D. student in the program said, "They're teaching us the basis of prevention and that's where we're supposed to be going; in Vedic times, the vaidyas were only paid when no one was ill."

Headlines

Rotating U. Heads to Thailand in Fall

BY ALESIA LLOYD

For the first time, Thailand's breathtaking architecture, beautiful gardens, ideal climate, and genuinely friendly people will be the locale for a Rotating University course to be offered this fall.

Ken West, assistant professor of management, and his wife Paula, instructor of Maharishi Vedic ScienceSM and Sanskrit, wish to invite University students to come and enjoy the rich and colorful culture of Thailand next November for a course on Ideal Leadership.

"My wife and I found Thailand to be a beautiful country," Mr. West said. "We thought it would be a great place to study Ideal Leadership due to the fact that it has never been under foreign influence and has maintained its cultural integrity. It has the longest ruling monarch of today who is truly loved and respected by the people and who exemplifies many qualities of Ideal Leadership."

Students can plan to study at the Rajaspark College, a school in Bangkok which the Wests helped establish a few years ago. "The building integrates the use of Maharishi Sthapatya Veda design with the brilliance of traditional Thai architecture," Mr. West said.

Each week students will take day trips to cultural sites as part of the curriculum, including trips to the ancient capital of Ayuthaya as well as outings within the city of Bangkok. "The Royal Kingdom of Thailand has a very strong Vedic influence that can be experienced readily and offers an exciting opportunity for our students to study in an exotic and colorful location," Mr. West said.

Headlines

East Entrance for Men's Dome Slated for Graduation

University officials are hopeful that the highly anticipated grand opening of the new east entrance of the Maharishi Patanjali Golden Dome will be finished by late June.

According to Marilyn Todt of the University's construction management office, all aspects of the reconstruction of the east half of the Dome are targeted for completion by graduation, including restrooms, sidewalks, and landscaping.

The new east entrance will have an outer vestibule. To the right there will be a large shoe room. Those attending program will then pass through another inner vestibule before entering the program hall. The new construction includes men's and ladies' bathrooms and a large area for asanas.

Following the completion of the east half, work will begin on the west half of the Dome. The "small dome" will be removed, and then construction will begin on the new exterior walls. A new stairway will be installed to the current restrooms, which will be renovated. Eventually an additional parking lot will be available south of the athletic field.

Headlines

Anne Hildenbrand Leaves Bequest to University

The late Anne Hildenbrand, who received an M.A. in SCI in 1986 at the age of 86 and then enrolled in the Professional Writing program, named the University in her will, amounting to a gift of $37,000--one of a number of recent bequests.

"It's very inspiring when we receive such a gift," said Sandra Rosania, co-director of development. "It's such a blessing to the University to know that people have us in their hearts."

Ms. Hildenbrand was a teacher of the Transcendental Meditation® technique and had a career as a psychologist. She was also an avid poet and writer of stories and published a number of books. After finishing her studies, she lived on campus for most of the last decade--and continued her writing.

Ms. Rosania said that the University has received a number of bequests, prompting the Development Office to establish the Office of Planned Giving, directed by Vicki Alexander, and to create the Legacy Society--a club for those including the University in their will or estate planning.

"Some people simply include the University in their will and specify an amount or percentage," Ms. Rosania said. "Others work with their lawyer and with Vicki Alexander to select a planned-giving option that benefits the University and also meets the needs of their family."

She offered as an example the recent bequest of George Svilich, who left two percent of the sale of his house to the University--a gift of nearly $3,000.

Ms. Rosania said that for most universities planned giving represents a large percentage of their income each year. About 40 percent of all gifts for education from individuals are from planned giving.

"The balance of resources beyond tuition must be raised by the University from grants, gifts, and bequests," Ms. Rosania said. "The continued success of the University depends in part on private gifts from generous individuals with the vision to insure the future of Consciousness-Based education for the world."

Headlines

Students Inspired by Talk by Successful Screenwriter

BY ALESIA LLOYD

Allan Greenberg, a highly successful screenwriter, recently gave an inspiring talk to a full house of students in the Student Union Theater last month, marking a highlight in the art department's visiting artist lecture series.

According to Judy Hans-Price, art department staff and organizer of the talk, much of Mr. Greenberg's experience has been working with one of Europe's best-known directors, Werner Herzog. "For the past decade these two have produced three books and two screen plays together and have met with much success," she said. Director Herzog's filmography includes two famous foreign language films which have become cult movie classics: Nosferatu the Vampyre and Aguirre: The Wrath of God.

Mr. Greenberg has received much attention in the film industry for his solo work as well. His first film, Land of Look Behind, won the Gold Hugo Award at the Chicago International Film Festival in 1982. His other credits include writing and producing his own screenplay Love in Vein: The Life and Legend of Blues Singer Robert Johnson, which will be a Martin Scorsese production next year.

"The screenplay for Love in Vein was so well received that it was immediately published as a novel, creating a new genre of literature," Ms. Hans-Price said. "This was the first time ever that a screenplay has been published on its own worth before going to production."

Mr. Greenberg credits practicing the Transcendental Meditation technique with making him a very principled writer. "He made a strong point that his work is based on principles," Ms. Hans-Price said. "He has quit a major high-level job for Paramount Studios for principled reasons including wasteful and excessive spending."

Mr. Greenberg encouraged the audience, comprised mainly of literature, art, and writing students, to be "true to themselves" and to "stick to their dreams and be uncompromising in their artwork." He said, "If an artist holds back anything, he is not an artist, but rather he becomes an artisan."

Ms. Hans-Price said that Mr. Greenberg was very impressed with Fairfield and the students here. "He noted that there was something palpable in this community--that everyone was so focused and knows who they are, and it really comes through in their eyes."

Mr. Greenberg met personally with Brian Smith's video production class and he also spoke to literature classes at Maharishi Upper School, as well as holding individual meetings.

Headlines

Concert of Acoustic Music by Canadian Singer/Songwriters

Canadian singer/songwriters Matthew MacLeod and Jory Nash will offer a concert of folk, country, and blues music in the Student Union Theater on Sunday, May 13, at 7:30 p.m.

Mr. MacLeod studied classical guitar at the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto, at McGill University in Montreal, and at the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama in Glasgow, Scotland.

He has been enrolled as a student at Maharishi University of Management since January and has recently turned his attention to writing folk music and hopes to release his first CD this summer titled Comedies, Histories and Tragedies.

Mr. MacLeod's songs range from the humorous comedy of stolen lines in "Don't Walk in the Wet Cement" to the tale of the famous Canadian painter who died a mysterious death in an overturned canoe in "The Ballad of Tom Thomson" to the tragic story of a broken heart in "My Swiss Heart Is Full of Holes."

He has played in cafés and theaters across Canada and recently gave a sold-out concert in March at Revelations. He has also played live on KMCD's "The Talk of Southeast Iowa."

The second half of the concert will feature Mr. Nash, one of Canada's most talented and diverse up-and-coming singer/songwriters. He will be passing through Fairfield on a two-month tour of the eastern U.S. promoting his second album Tangle with the Ghost.

Mr. Nash plays contemporary folk-style, with elements of jazz, blues, country, R&B, and pop. He performs on both acoustic guitar and old-time banjo. His song writing has been compared to Paul Simon, Gordon Lightfoot, Nick Drake, and Joni Mitchell.

He recently won first place at the Ontario Council of Folk Festivals "Songs from the Heart" competition. His first CD spent over four months on the chart of top-50 albums.

"His voice is one of the most inspiring and touching I've ever heard," Mr. MacLeod said. To get a sample of his music, visit www.jorynash.com.

Headlines

Soccer Club Starts Season Strong, State Reputation High

The University soccer club played a dominant first match of the spring season, winning 5-0 against one of the stronger teams in their league.

The club has a reputation of being among the best in the state, not only winning their league championship two years ago but also nearly defeating the University of Iowa student soccer club in an indoor tournament this winter, losing in the final in overtime.

"We're considered one of the strongest teams in Iowa," said Ahmed Al-hafedh, a first-year graduate student in psychology who joined the team as a player last fall and who is helping guide the team in the absence of a coach.

"If we were more in shape and had the means to have a real soccer practice, we could be the best in the state."

He said that the team is rebuilding this spring, having lost their coach and one of their top players, both of whom moved away. Some of the second-team players are developing fast as are several Maharishi School students who are playing with the club, he said.

The club is also currently raising funds in order to establish a solid foundation of equipment and materials to practice with, as well as training materials. Mr. Al-hafedh said that the condition of the field near the Dome is dangerously rough, but that the team has recently secured permission to practice on the Maharishi School field.

In addition to Mr. Al-hafedh, Carlo Castillo is serving as a player/coach, both of them working with the team on tactics. University student Jaimini Hatchard is also helping with coaching and with organization in addition to playing on the team.

For information about the team, send e-mail to ahafedh@mum.edu.

Headlines

Chamber Singers Offer Annual Spring Concert

On the weekend of May 19 and 20, the Maharishi University of Management Chamber Singers will present their annual spring concert, singing their way through the centuries on a wave of springtime themes.

Love, loss, peace, praise, and the beauty of nature are the subject matter of this diverse musical program. The Chamber Singers will give two performances at two different locations: Saturday, May 19, at 8:00 p.m. at St. Mary's Church, 404 N. 3rd Street; and Sunday, May 20, at 8:00 p.m. at the Student Union Theater.

For those who enjoy variety, this wide-ranging choral program will be a garden of delights. The program includes both sacred and secular music from the 1400s to 2001, with unaccompanied (a cappella) works as well as accompanied pieces featuring recorders, violins, cello, and harpsichord.

The selections cover many musical forms, including motets, chansons, madrigals, and contemporary styles, composed by both well-known composers such as Monteverdi, Saint-Saëns, and Hindemith and highly acclaimed contemporary composers such as Hogan and Lauridsen.

Over the course of the program, the Chamber Singers will sing in five different languages: English, Latin, German, French, and Italian. In addition to the large-group performances, the concert will feature solos, a duet, a quartet, and an octet.

"We're having a great time with our spring program," says Elaine Reding, founder and musical director of the Chamber Singers. "The pieces we've selected sample the range of human emotion, from deep spiritual devotion and exuberant praise of the divine to playful love songs and appreciation of the beauty of spring. The diversity of musical styles, forms, and feelings reflects the cultural and historic range of the music."

Tickets for the concerts are $5 and will be available at Somebody Cares, the University Bookstore, and at the door for both venues--Saturday night at St. Mary's Church and Sunday night at the Student Union Theater.

Headlines

Annual Spring Variety Show

The spring Variety Show will be held on Saturday, May 26, at 8:00 p.m. in the Student Union Ballroom.

Students, staff, and faculty will be showing off their talents in musical acts, skits, dancing, and dramatic presentations. Performers from town are invited to audition as well, but will not be eligible for prizes.

Prizes will be $100 for first, $75 for second, and $50 for third. There will also be an audience-choice award of $25. A dance after the show will feature professional deejay Frankie T.

Headlines

Cantus Angelicus to Present Concert

This year the Cantus Angelicus Choral Society presents its concert "A Choral Bouquet for Spring" on Friday, May 18, at 8:00 p.m. and Sunday, May 20, at 2:30 p.m.

Both performances will be at the First Christian Church on the northeast corner of Third Street and Burlington in Fairfield. The concert offers listeners a chance to enjoy the works prepared for performance in June at International Festival 2001 in Sopron, Hungary, just 44 miles from Vienna. The choir's new release, its second CD, will also be available at concert time.

This year's concert features many first-time Cantus Angelicus performances highlighting the emotional depth of pre-renaissance French composer Josquin de Prez, the glorious rejoicing of Spanish renaissance composer Victoria, and the warmth and charm of Johannes Brahms. The concert also includes works by the great early baroque composer Heinrich Schütz, and several sacred pieces from the uniquely American shape-note and Appalachian traditions.

Guest artists this season will include Margaret Wadell performing chants by Hildegard von Bingen and accompanied by Cantus Angelicus members singing a steady background drone. Cantus Angelicus organist Barbara Dickins will accompany violinist Sonia Gunderson in a performance of English composer Edward Elgar's "Salut d'Amour." Meret Amick, Carol Carlisle, David Ballou, and David Carlisle with join to sing the spiritual "Deep River" and a medley of moving African spirituals.

Cantus Angelicus was invited to Europe as a result of streaming audio samples on its web site. Director Robert Wendell has been interviewed on classical music NPR affiliate KSUI FM 91.7 of the University of Iowa in two hour-long airings of its CD performances, and the choir is included in next season's Fairfield Community Concert series. For information on the Cantus Angelicus Choral Society, see www.cangelic.org.

Advance tickets for either concert are available at Somebody Cares on the Fairfield square and in the University Bookstore. They are $7 general, $4 students, and $1 more at the door. Children will be considered students and should be mature enough to quietly enjoy the performance with their families.

Headlines

Faculty Performance Artist to Present in Iowa City

Cherie Sampson, a faculty member in the School of the Arts, and her collaborator Deanne Warnholtz-Wortman will present a performance-art piece in Iowa City on May 18 and 19 at 8:00 p.m. in the Space/Place Theater, North Hall, University of Iowa.

The piece, titled "her blue sea fire," is based on the first canto of the Finnish epic poem The Kalevala.

The performance will last approximately 40 minutes. Tickets will be available at the door.

Headlines

®Transcendental Meditation, Consciousness-Based, Maharishi Consciousness-Based Health Care, Maharishi Sthapatya Veda, Maharishi Gandharva Veda, Maharishi Vedic Science, Maharishi Vedic Astrology, Maharishi Jyotish, Maharishi Yagya, Maharishi School of the Age of Enlightenment, Maharishi College of Vedic Medicine, and Maharishi University of Management are registered or common law trademarks licensed to Maharishi Vedic Education Development Corporation and used under sublicense.


The Review is written and produced approximately twice a month during the academic year .Send comments to Jim Karpen at jkarpen@lisco.com