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Monday, September 22, 2014

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Living Soil Lab Offers First Time Ever Course to the Public - Cultivating the Soil Food Web and Enhancing Plant Productivity
Have you ever wanted to make compost and wound up with a stinky, fly infested mess?  Ever made successful compost but were unsure how to go about making compost tea and applying it?  Maybe you know a bit about soil biology but aren't sure of the specifics, or how to go about learning what biology is in your soil.  Now, at last, there is an opportunity to have all your questions answered and learn to work with your soil to improve the health of your garden or farm.  The Living Soil Lab at Maharishi University of Management is offering its first time ever course to the public: Cultivating the Soil Food Web and Enhancing Plant Productivity. 

During the four day course Sustainable Living graduates Molly Haviland and Zach Write, as well as Soil Lab manager Jacob Isaacs will teach you about the soil food web, nutrient cycling, decomposition, and how to use a microscope.  You will build your own aerobic, thermal compost pile, use a microscope to assess soil and compost samples, and take part in a one hour question and answer session with Rodale Institute Chief Scientist Dr. Elaine Ingham.

After this exciting course you'll be entitled to a three month membership to open lab times at the Living Soil Laboratory.  There you can continue to hone your new skills by analyzing soil samples with your peers, sharing your progress, and asking any questions that may come up during your work.  Mark your calendars, and contact Molly to sign up - you, your soil, and your plants will be so happy you did!

This workshop is sponsored by The Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture and the Sustainable Living Program at Maharishi University of Management.

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